an everyday photo, every day | photography • art • poetry

moon

Blue Moon?

Blue Moon
Blue Moon

Blue Moon

Looks kind of yellow to me.

And I’m hearing the song.

. . . . . . .

All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Thunder Moon

mist in moonlight
mist in moonlight

Moonrise

In 2006 I was still lugging around a few film cameras that could capture what my first little 2MP point-and-shoot digital could not. I’d been working with a number of local and larger land conservation groups for years and had a literal field day photographing and painting those beautiful areas as they recovered from industrial or other use, or were simply conserved as overgrown land that housed an ecosystem all their own.

mist in moonlight

Softened Layers

At the same time I was canoeing Chartiers Creek, sometimes for work but usually for fun, and from early morning until night I saw incredibly lovely scenes that I couldn’t catch in a moving canoe. I vowed to return some time to capture as many as I could in different areas.

mist in moonlight

Sentinels

I was familiar with Wingfield Pines as a large flood plain conservation area and also for its access to the creek, and I remembered at one evening event watching the moon rise over the ridge to the east, so when I got the idea to photograph the moon rising in summer using black and white film I chose that destination. Next full moon available was the Thunder Moon in July.

mist in moonlight

Mist in the Trees

Though it was a clear night, a mist rose with the moon. These were shot with film, and while I had my notes from a test session on a night with a partial moon, and from photographing the moon at other times, I knew the mist was a variable I couldn’t control, and I might possible end up with just a bunch of blur because the mist was moving across the open field, not hanging in the air like a fog.

mist in moonlight

Moonlight Through the Pines

When I got the photos back I was so disappointed at not being able to get the clarity I’d remembered in the moon and the surroundings that I put them away for a bit, then got them back out and decided I liked them for what they were. In fact, I find them quite magical. A few of them I like very much.

mist in moonlight

Path Across the Creek

And because a few of canoeing buddies didn’t want me wandering around on a full moon night in an isolated area alone, or walking in the creek with my camera gear and no one else around, they joined me.

mist in moonlight

Aliens

I truly need a better scanner, but since this is a “supermoon” month, I’ve decided to scan and share them anyway.

Moon-1000px

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.

All images in this post are copyright © Bernadette E. Kazmarski and may not be used without prior written permission.


Not Quite Full, Not Quite Empty

moon in bare tree branches
moon in bare tree branches

Not Quite Full, Not Quite Empty

The not-quite-full Beaver Moon shines through the not-quite-empty wild black cherry branches on an early November night.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. 


Partly Cloudy

supermoon with clouds

 

supermoon with clouds

Partly Cloudy

I have so many photos of the full moon and the supermoon they all look the same, so I decided to try something a little different last night and catch a few clouds too. I see streaks of ambient color in the background because I shot this one pretty dark to get the detail in the moon, but not so dark that I lost the clouds. Almost okay.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.

All images in this post are copyright © Bernadette E. Kazmarski and may not be used without prior written permission.


Thunder Moon

mist in moonlight
mist in moonlight

Moonrise

In 2006 I was still lugging around a few film cameras that could capture what my first little 2MP point-and-shoot digital could not. I’d been working with a number of local and larger land conservation groups for years and had a literal field day photographing and painting those beautiful areas as they recovered from industrial or other use, or were simply conserved as overgrown land that housed an ecosystem all their own.

mist in moonlight

Softened Layers

At the same time I was canoeing Chartiers Creek, sometimes for work but usually for fun, and from early morning until night I saw incredibly lovely scenes that I couldn’t catch in a moving canoe. I vowed to return some time to capture as many as I could in different areas.

mist in moonlight

Sentinels

I was familiar with Wingfield Pines as a large flood plain conservation area and also for its access to the creek, and I remembered at one evening event watching the moon rise over the ridge to the east, so when I got the idea to photograph the moon rising in summer using black and white film I chose that destination. Next full moon available was the Thunder Moon in July.

mist in moonlight

Mist in the Trees

Though it was a clear night, a mist rose with the moon. These were shot with film, and while I had my notes from a test session on a night with a partial moon, and from photographing the moon at other times, I knew the mist was a variable I couldn’t control, and I might possible end up with just a bunch of blur because the mist was moving across the open field, not hanging in the air like a fog.

mist in moonlight

Moonlight Through the Pines

When I got the photos back I was so disappointed at not being able to get the clarity I’d remembered in the moon and the surroundings that I put them away for a bit, then got them back out and decided I liked them for what they were. In fact, I find them quite magical. A few of them I like very much.

mist in moonlight

Path Across the Creek

And because a few of canoeing buddies didn’t want me wandering around on a full moon night in an isolated area alone, or walking in the creek with my camera gear and no one else around, they joined me.

mist in moonlight

Aliens

I truly need a better scanner, but since this is a “supermoon” month, I’ve decided to scan and share them anyway.

Moon-1000px

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.

All images in this post are copyright © Bernadette E. Kazmarski and may not be used without prior written permission.


Full Wolf Moon

moonrise in bare tree
moonrise in bare tree

Wolf Moonrise

The winter sunset shades to deep pink in the east as the Wolf Moon rises over the hill, encircled by the branches of an oak tree.

The moon still looks a little hard-edged and flashed out, but at least I managed to get a little detail on it. Usually under these conditions the moon looks like a flashlight in the sky, just a hard bright circle, but it was moderated somewhat, perhaps by the branches in front of it.

And I finally caught that pink glow over the horizon fading to the faded turquoise of a winter sky in the east, opposite a sunset, on a clear, cold night.

. . . . . . .

I quickly shot this photo as I packed my camera equipment out of my car on my way to the paranormal investigation at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall January 7, 2012. My family, especially my mother, had a strong tie to the place; in the houses you can see near the bottom of the photo, my mother was born and grew up in the one you can see the best, the yellow one.

. . . . . . .

A few months after I’d published this image, a conservation organization in California asked permission to use the image in their newsletter to accompany a poem by William Carlos Williams. Would I mind…

The Hills Conservation Network (HCN) of Oakland CA published one of my photos, “Wolf Moonrise”, in their latest newsletter.

The HCN was formed after the devastating 1991 East Bay Hills fire. In a state known for wildfires this was the worst one to date in 1991, killing 25 people and injuring  52 others, leaving some 10,000 people homeless by destroying 3,354 single-family homes and 456 apartment units. The group formed to help organize efforts in restoring the scarred land while  preparing for other wildfires in a way that would mitigate future damage as much as possible.

They publish a quarterly newsletter, and in this case the Winter 2012 was “celebrating trees”. They would publish a poem by William Carlos Williams entitled Winter Trees and wanted my photo to illustrate.

No one has to twist my arm to have a photo published along with a poem by William Carlos Williams, and while I didn’t remember this particular poem once I read it I was in full agreement, especially at the lines: A liquid moon/moves gently among/the long branches.

I am also glad to help an organization whose mission I support, and those interested in carefully reforesting and restoring the land and preparing wisely for future actions.

Click here to read the newsletter; my photo and the poem are on page 3.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Moon with Leaves

moon with leaves
moon with leaves

Moon with Leaves

This shot has some interesting colors in it, the leaves around the moon look as if they are gathered in a circle, and the leaves silhouetted by the moonlight appear to spell something…

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Moon with Branches

Moon with Branches
Moon with Branches

Moon with Branches

A few quick shots of tonight’s full moon. Since I have so many of just the moon already, I’m looking for shots that are just a little different. Here I photographed it through the near branches of a tree. A little later I photographed it through leaves…

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Shine On Harvest Moon

photo of full moon
photo of full moon

Harvest Moon

Unlike other moons through the year, the Harvest Moon doesn’t always occur in a certain month but is the full moon nearest the Autumnal Equinox, whether before or after, even in October, called such because the extra light was welcome during harvest time in typically dry autumn conditions, perfect for harvesting fields of grain. In addition to the extra light, the moon also rises at nearly the same time every night. The moon usually rises about 50 minutes later each night, but because of the physics of the moon, sun and earth the moon rises are only about 20 minutes apart, always in the early evening so the extra light to harvest by is right after sunset and farmers could just keep working until the moon went below the horizon. Read an article in today’s Farmer’s Almanac and National Geographic for more information on the Harvest Moon.

This moon is from 2010—we are a little overcast near the horizon this evening but three years ago we were clear from edge to edge and I got the best moon photo I’ve ever gotten.


Just Past First Quarter

first quarter moon during day
first quarter moon during day

Just Past First Quarter

In this brilliant winter sky the moon looked so delicate, almost transparent.

My lens isn’t quite doing it, but I had to photograph it nonetheless.


Wolf Moonrise

moonrise in bare tree
moonrise in bare tree

Wolf Moonrise

The winter sunset shades to deep pink in the east as the Wolf Moon rises over the hill, encircled by the branches of an oak tree.

The moon still looks a little hard-edged and flashed out, but at least I managed to get a little detail on it. Usually under these conditions the moon looks like a flashlight in the sky, just a hard bright circle, but it was moderated somewhat, perhaps by the branches in front of it.

And I finally caught that pink glow over the horizon fading to the faded turquoise of a winter sky in the east, opposite a sunset, on a clear, cold night.

. . . . . . .

Before I go on, I will add that I quickly shot this photo as I packed my camera equipment out of my car on my way to the paranormal investigation at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall January 7, 2012. My family, especially my mother, had a strong tie to the place; in the houses you can see near the bottom of the photo, my mother was born and grew up in the one you can see the best, the yellow one.

. . . . . . .

A few months after I’d published this image, a conservation organization in California asked permission to use the image in their newsletter to accompany a poem by William Carlos Williams. Would I mind…

The Hills Conservation Network (HCN) of Oakland CA published one of my photos, “Wolf Moonrise”, in their latest newsletter.

The HCN was formed after the devastating 1991 East Bay Hills fire. In a state known for wildfires this was the worst one to date in 1991, killing 25 people and injuring  52 others, leaving some 10,000 people homeless by destroying 3,354 single-family homes and 456 apartment units. The group formed to help organize efforts in restoring the scarred land while  preparing for other wildfires in a way that would mitigate future damage as much as possible.

They publish a quarterly newsletter, and in this case the Winter 2012 was “celebrating trees”. They would publish a poem by William Carlos Williams entitled Winter Trees and wanted my photo to illustrate.

No one has to twist my arm to have a photo published along with a poem by William Carlos Williams, and while I didn’t remember this particular poem once I read it I was in full agreement, especially at the lines: A liquid moon/moves gently among/the long branches.

I am also glad to help an organization whose mission I support, and those interested in carefully reforesting and restoring the land and preparing wisely for future actions.

Click here to read the newsletter; my photo and the poem are on page 3.

Click here to see the original entry for “Wolf Moonrise” on my daily image blog Today.


Moonlit Sycamores

moon and sycamore trees
moon and sycamore trees

Moonlit Sycamores

The Cold Moon of December is not quite full but illumines the land with the cool blue of coming winter in the deep dusk of a winter evening.


Lunaria

photo of lunaria
photo of lunaria

Lunaria

Lunaria for the full moon.

Honesty for its pure white color.

Money plant because we can all use a little extra now and then, and if we can grow it in the backyard, so much the better.

This plant has self-seeded since the first year I was here and planted some seeds in a flower bed. Now it comes up wherever it pleases and most of the time I let it because it’s so beautiful with spring’s pink or white phlox-like blossoms, and in the autumn when the seed pods dry and I peel them away to reveal the transparent pearly white membrane that once held the seeds apart in the pod.

At other times it really looks like an undesirable, its first-year floret of leaves resembling a thistle without the thorns, and in the time between blossom and seed looking like a struggling half-hybrid.

It is officially called Lunaria because of its color and shape resemblance to the moon, but every popular plant picks up familiar names.

So I have harvested this year’s money from the back yard and placed some for display and shared more this friends. That can’t be too bad either.


Moon and Oak, 2011

moonrise over oak trees
moonrise over oak trees

Moon and Oak

A hillside of oak trees is burnished by the late afternoon sun till it glows like copper, and the pale, nearly full moon rises above. To me the moon always looks translucent when it rises at this time of day, as if all the craters and darker areas on its surface are open, letting the sky shine through. The copper of the oaks and the aqua sky are such a beautiful combination.


Moonrise, 2010

moon rise
moon rise

Moonrise

The moon as it comes toward full rises earlier and earlier. Here it just appeared over a grove of sycamores just as the sun was setting, still, silent, waiting.


Shine On, Harvest Moon, 2011

harvest moon

Harvest Moon

I finally caught some color in the sky and a yellow moon. The Harvest Moon always looks extra golden, round and fat as if it, too, is ready for harvest.

Last year on this day we had a full moon on this day, but in 2012, the September full moon doesn’t fall until September 29.

September’s full moon is called the Full Corn Moon for the time of harvesting corn, and also the Full Barley Moon for the harvest and threshing of barley, and the Fruit Moon for the ripening of fruit in both hemispheres, autumn fruits in the northern hemisphere, and spring fruits in the southern hemisphere. While each month’s moon keeps its particular name, the Harvest Moon is an additional name for the full moon nearest the autumnal equinox. What characterizes this moon as the Harvest is that, unlike other times of the year, the moon rises an average of 30 minutes later each day rather than the usual 50 minutes. That gives this string of days, about two weeks, more light in the evening as the full moon approaches, arrives and departs, so work days for harvesting can be longer.

Read about the Corn Moon and the Harvest Moon on the Farmer’s Almanac.

 


The Evening Star

the evening star
the evening star

The Evening Star

I first posted this in July 2010 as I left a visit to my mother in a nursing home, not long after her 85th birthday. Today she would have been 87; I have another remembrance in the works, but I post this today to celebrate her birthday.

What a beautiful sight in the night sky long after the sun had set but still colored the horizon. I was convinced this point of light was an airplane since there were others moving in that area, very near Pittsburgh International Airport. But this one held its ground.

I only had my little hand-held digital with me, and I don’t have as much control over the lens as I do with my SLR, but the photo looks like a tropical evening even though it’s Pennsylvania and I’m in the parking lot of Kane Regional Nursing Hospital leaving from a visit with my mother. A rejuvenating sight after an evening visit.

The evening star, the real “star” of the evening, here is Venus, showing just after sunset and brightening as the sky darkened around it. To the upper left are Saturn and Mars, much fainter and only appearing as the sky nears full dark; I actually didn’t see them at first, then thought they were just digital dust in a slightly grainy image. But I snapped several images over the course of a few minutes and the last one included them in full, though I didn’t know it at the time!

The full Thunder Moon was rising behind me, but by the time I got that photo a slight haze of clouds had moved in front and I couldn’t get a clear one.


Spring Moon: 2010

moonrise with church

Moonrise

Very much like the late crescent moon rising tonight.

The eager Sap Moon rises early on her way to full, just as the sap rises in the trees at this time in March.


Supermoon: 2011

photo of moon from march 19 2011

Supermoon

Here is the full moon from March 19, the “Supermoon”. It certainly did appear larger than most other moons I’ve photographed, though I didn’t have a way to show the scale so here it looks like any other moon.

Still, the full moon is a beautiful creature and I have always enjoyed studying her surface patterns. They’ve always looked like cities and roads, like what you see when you fly over the desert.

This full moon has been one of the most meaningful and exuberant in cultures throughout human history as evidenced by these full moon names from various traditions, regions and beliefs:

  • Pink Moon, named for the wild phlox or “pinks” which are often the earliest showy flowers to bloom in the woods and fields;
  • Sprouting Grass Moon, because grass will begin to sprout in most of the northern hemisphere except the most northern regions;
  • Egg Moon, I’ve never heard a clear explanation of this one, but it may be that chickens in unheated coops will produce more eggs as the days lengthen and grow warmer;
  • Fish Moon, fish begin migrating and spawning;
  • Worm Moon, worms begin moving as the soil thaws, leaving castings for the garden and attracting robins;
  • Crow Moon, crows begin to caw signaling the end of winter;
  • Crust Moon, snowcover melts during the day and freezes over at night;
  • Sap Moon, sap begins to flow in trees and shrubs, especially maple trees;
  • Lenten Moon, this full moon always falls during Lent, no matter when Easter falls;
  • Paschal Moon, only in some years, when the March full moon falls after the equinox marking both Easter and Passover—this year the April full moon will be the Paschal moon.

“Wolf Moonrise” Published in Conservation Newsletter

moonrise in bare tree

Wolf Moonrise

The Hills Conservation Network (HCN) of Oakland CA published one of my photos, “Wolf Moonrise”, in their latest newsletter.

The HCN was formed after the devastating 1991 East Bay Hills fire. In a state known for wildfires this was the worst one to date in 1991, killing 25 people and injuring  52 others, leaving some 10,000 people homeless by destroying 3,354 single-family homes and 456 apartment units. The group formed to help organize efforts in restoring the scarred land while  preparing for other wildfires in a way that would mitigate future damage as much as possible.

They publish a quarterly newsletter, and in this case the Winter 2012 was “celebrating trees”. They would publish a poem by William Carlos Williams entitled Winter Trees and wanted my photo to illustrate.

No one has to twist my arm to have a photo published along with a poem by William Carlos Williams, and while I didn’t remember this particular poem once I read it I was in full agreement, especially at the lines: A liquid moon/moves gently among/the long branches.

I am also glad to help an organization whose mission I support, and those interested in carefully reforesting and restoring the land and preparing wisely for future actions.

Click here to read the newsletter; my photo and the poem are on page 3.

Click here to see the original entry for “Wolf Moonrise” on my daily image blog Today.


Wolf Moonrise

moonrise in bare tree

Wolf Moonrise

The winter sunset shades to deep pink in the east as the Wolf Moon rises over the hill, encircled by the branches of an oak tree.

The moon still looks a little hard-edged and flashed out, but at least I managed to get a little detail on it. Usually under these conditions the moon looks like a flashlight in the sky, just a hard bright circle, but it was moderated somewhat, perhaps by the branches in front of it.

And I finally caught that pink glow over the horizon fading to the faded turquoise of a winter sky in the east, opposite a sunset, on a clear, cold night.


Moonlight Sycamores

moon and sycamore trees

Moonlit Sycamores

The Cold Moon of December is not quite full but illumines the land with the cool blue of coming winter in the deep dusk of a late autumn evening.


Moon and Oak

moonrise over oak trees

Moon and Oak

A hillside of oak trees is burnished by the late afternoon sun till it glows like copper, and the pale, nearly full moon rises above. To me the moon always looks translucent when it rises at this time of day, as if all the craters and darker areas on its surface are open, letting the sky shine through. The copper of the oaks and the aqua sky are such a beautiful combination.


Shine On, Harvest Moon

harvest moon

Harvest Moon

I finally caught some color in the sky and a yellow moon. The Harvest Moon always looks extra golden, round and fat as if it, too, is ready for harvest.