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pittsburgh

The Vertical Neighborhood

Polish Hill, Pittsburgh
Polish Hill, Pittsburgh

Polish Hill, Pittsburgh

Polish Hill has long called itself “Pittsburgh’s most vertical neighborhood” and you can see that you are on the edge of a very steep street, and with the descending roofs of the buildings on the left this street is at least one example of that designation. They are all pretty steep, many just as steep as this one, and all dominated by Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church where mass is still said daily in Polish, the industrial and warehouse district of Pittsburgh beyond, and the Allegheny River and the 31st Street Bridge beyond that. It has its share of immigrants and descendants of immigrants and working people and young people, all clinging to the hillside.

Below is another shot I found interesting because I liked the bike parked by the rail at the top of the hill, and still the church over all; these buildings are the backs of the ones seen in the photo above. But it was a dark snowy day and there was an ambulance behind me so I had no time to get out of my car to get the photo. One of these days I’ll go back.

photo of city street

A bike at the top of the hill.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Magenta Meander

walkway lit with pink lights.
walkway lit with pink lights.

Magenta Meander

A walkway to the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh, under the David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

I was at the Convention Center for the Pet Expo over the weekend, and when I left Saturday night after a long day, I heard water and thought it was raining. As it turns out, there was an area to drive through between the two sides of the building, and this pathway between the lanes with a waterfall, the water flowing down the vertical walls then down the stepped area next to the walkway, lit with magenta lights. It was totally enchanting! This couple had also been taking photos, one figure walking all the way down below the catwalk I was standing on, then walking back up to the person taking photos.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Pittsburgh Autumn Bridge

pittsburgh hills in autumn and bridge
pittsburgh hills in autumn and bridge

Pittsburgh Autumn Bridge

Well, I was stuck in traffic on a lovely autumn day, so I took a photo through the windshield. But it’s typical Pittsburgh, a suspension bridge, a steep hill covered with trees and peppered with houses, a few churches in various denominations mixed in, incredible clouds and a lovely blue above, plus you know there’s a river in there somewhere. Pittsburgh is a lovely city but on a day like yesterday it’s breathtaking.

I wish my travels had allowed me to safely take a few other photos, but you can’t just stop in the middle of traffic, let the camera focus and click a few times without some difficulty in traffic flow. I passed no fewer than five major universities and an international teaching hospital, probably a dozen or more national historic sites and the headweaters of the Ohio River, to name a few things, plus dozens of distinct neighborhoods.

I just wonder who got up there and painted the dinosaurs on the rigging.

It’s the 10th Street Bridge that connects downtown Pittsburgh with the South Side.


Three Birds in Flight in the Lobby

aluminum sculpture of birds
aluminum sculpture of birds

“Three Birds in Flight” by Mary Callery

“Three Birds in Flight” by sculptor Mary Callery has soared through the multi-story entrance to the Regional Enterprise Tower in Pittsburgh for 60 years.

This building was once called Alcoa Tower, housing the home offices of the Aluminum Company of America, or ALCOA, and the building is faced with aluminum. This sculpture was made from 700 pounds of aluminum and was installed in the lobby when the Alcoa Tower was opened in 1953. Callery was born in New York but grew up in Pittsburgh, traveling to Europe and settling in France. She returned to the United States during WWII and later returned to France. Among many other sculptures in her life’s work, she was commissioned to create three sculptures in aluminum for the Alcoa Tower, “Three Birds in Flight” being one of them. I am honored to have a sculpture by such a renowned artist in our city, and I find it interesting that in an era when female artists were not taken seriously ALCOA chose to commission a woman to create its signature welcoming sculptures.

Read more about Mary Callery and more about this sculpture.


Monongahela Fog

foggy morning
foggy morning

Monongahela Fog

It could have been a scene from a century ago at the J&L Steel plant along the Monongahela River, but it’s just a foggy October morning.

A spectacularly foggy morning, the type that only autumn provides. This is a bend in the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh, the bit of a bridge you see is the Birmingham Bridge from the South Side Flats to the Boulevard of the Allies in the Lower Hill/Uptown/South Oakland. The steam rises from a concrete plant on Second Avenue, on the river’s edge, where the J&L Plant once stood; in the distance you see the first of the buildings in Oakland leading to Carlow University, Chatham University, the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. In this fog, this could have been taken decades ago, representing the smog from the mills. The mills are gone, the air and the rivers are relatively clean, but the colleges, the neighborhoods, the essence of Pittsburgh is still there in the rolling fog of an October morning.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Troy Hill, Pittsburgh

Troy Hill, Pittsburgh
Troy Hill, Pittsburgh

On the Edge

Great view! On a bluff above the Allegheny River just across from downtown Pittsburgh, these colorful old houses looks like a little street somewhere in Europe, which is pretty much what it was patterned after.

But I couldn’t decide which was better—the row of houses, or the view of the whole scene, sky, houses, hillside, river and all.

Troy Hill, Pittsburgh

Troy Hill, Pittsburgh

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.

 


“All global waters are our bathtub.”

40 ft rubber duck on allegheny river
40 ft rubber duck on allegheny river

The Duck visits Pittsburgh.

The duck is in Pittsburgh, floating on the Allegheny River right by the Point, where the Allegheny and Monongahela converge to create the Ohio River. And as the artist Florentijn Hofman said of the project, people have come together to look, to talk and to engage opinions. Considering the multitude of cultures in this city between the universities, high-tech companies and the health care industry, it also achieves his goal of bringing world cultures together.

Also, each city the duck visits builds its own duck. Our duck was fabricated by an inflatables company in Ohio, and the pontoon structure was made just north of Pittsburgh in Newcastle.

rubber duck on river in pittsburgh

People gather around the duck.

Especially on rivers that were once sludgy with pollution Hofman’s point of our global waters being our bathtub is well taken. How many people know where their water comes from? How many people in Pittsburgh know our water comes from our three rivers? We do indeed bathe in this river, and the substances we drain into it flows downstream for others to use as their bathtub after us.

Below, in the city that gave us Mister Rogers, it’s just a beautiful day in the neighborhood, with a big yellow rubber ducky on the river. Read more in the Post-Gazette.

rubber duck on allegheny river in pittsburgh

A beautiful day in the neighborhood, with a duck.


Twilight Under the Bridge

pittsburgh at twilight
pittsburgh at twilight

Pittsburgh at Twilight

A view of Pittsburgh from a distance up the Allegheny River at twilight. On the left is a portion of the city, on the right the angled red line on the hill is the Duquesne Incline from Mt. Washington down to Carson Street along the Ohio River. Straight ahead are three bridges too dark to distinguish and under them the Point where the Allegheny and Monongahela meet and form the Ohio.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Just a Little Anachronism

turret with wall
turret with wall

Anachronism

Hey, who left their castle behind when the centuries changed?

This castle turret may think it’s convincing people that it surrounds a moat, but the fire hydrant kind of gives it away, and the gas station across the street.

This is the far corner of Allegheny Cemetery in Lawrenceville, established in 1844, at the corner of Stanton Avenue and Butler Street. It gave me a good laugh as I sat at the light.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Ladies’ Dresses

ladies dresses
ladies dresses

Ladies’ Dresses

Lots and lots of ladies’ dresses hanging in, of all places, the Strip District in Pittsburgh. Do we strip and try them on? No, it’s just the original strip of wholesale warehouses for all sorts of produce and dry goods. And ladies’ dresses.

I applied the “poster edges” filter to achieve the vibrance and contrast from the original scene; I had to take the photo through my car window.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


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