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Sound and Season

image

I found myself walking in an increasing downpour on my way home from the bank, with an umbrella, but the splashing rain was soaking from the bottom up. The sounds of rain, from insistently tapping on my umbrella to falling off the edge of a bridge into a puddle of its own making to the sound of the creek rushing past to the crashing of the stream in its concrete inlet on its way to the creek, the autumn rainfall was quite the symphony of sound and season.

Copyright (c) Bernadette E. Kazmarski


Suspended

image

Suspended

The bridge, the trees, the buildings are all suspended from the surface of the water.

(C) 2015 Bernadette E. Kazmarski. All rights reserved.


On The Bridge

On The Bridge
On The Bridge

On The Bridge

On the bridge. It’s that odd glowing light and the stark shapes of the bench and post and paved street and wall, the darkness beyond, that makes it seem like it may be an execution.

Another from Instagram

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Gone Haywire

Gone Haywire
Gone Haywire

Gone Haywire

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Derelict

old house
old house

Derelict

Not so long ago this was farmland, this steep hill that rises above a community just outside of downtown Pittsburgh. It is still as quiet as it looks, though there is a four-lane road far down in that valley that carries traffic into and out of Pittsburgh. Hawks solemnly circle, a bit of winter wind buffets the brambles and whispers among tall grass as the elderly farmhouse slowly falls to pieces; even the ancient pine tree, planted as a windbreak when the house was young, no doubt, is just a stump with its height broken away, perhaps what created the hole in the slate-shingled roof. Not a big house, but just enough. Who knows what spirits are housed there in what remains of a place that once protected people from the elements, provided them with shelter. Sometimes it seems right that an elderly home falls of its own accord, instead of being broken and battered and buried, so it can release its memories one by one

Here are a few other derelict houses:

Abandoned

Derelict, 2010

Derelict, 2011

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


U.S.

US army pin
US army pin

U.S.

The brass pin from my father’s Army cap from WWII, a little tarnished, a little battered, but it still says “US”. That’s all of us, and it’s up to us all to ensure our freedom.

Happy Veteran’s Day.

Read more posts about my father’s service and the service of others in my family, as well as other veterans from Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


ALT “Vistas” Newsletter Summer 2014

I love it when I get to use one of my photos for a design, and don’t miss the summer issue of Allegheny Land Trust’s “Vistas” newsletter.

What's New in Bernadette's Studio?

newsletter design ALT “Vistas” Summer 2014

The summer issue of Vistas has been out for a while! We’ve used the new look and layout again, including this wonderful magazine-style front cover with just a nice juicy photo of the grass in one of the conservation areas after a storm, and one blue darner damselfly. That’s a photo I took five years ago and I was thrilled to be able to use it.

Vistas had always printed with the same three colors from the logo and the green bars on the outside edge of each page and the same photo pasted into the text for the title, but a few years ago we began to use seasonal colors and then finally changed over to resemble more of a magazine on gloss-coated paper stock instead of the uncoated and a photo featured on the front cover. You can read more about the changes we…

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Ready

rose of sharon seeds
rose of sharon seeds

Ready

Dry amber pods have burst open in the cold of winter and fuzzy Rose of Sharon seeds curled like embryos sit waiting in their compartments for the wind to bear them off to start a new life.

Here is what Rose of Sharon flowers look like in bloom and at other times of the year.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Waiting

row of antique chairs
row of antique chairs

Waiting

A row of antique bentwood chairs awaits the long-dead members of the Capt. Thos. Espy Post in the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall; these quiet chairs in somber light speak of lives past.

The chairs, the quarter-sawn oak panels, glass-front bookcases holding books that chronicle the Civil War are all authentic, left behind from the members of this post room, opened in 1906. The carpet is a printed replica that resembles the scraps of carpet surviving around the edges of the room. Once there were over 7,000 posts for members of the Grand Army of the Republic all over the country, now there are only six, and this one is possibly the most intact, and lovingly restored to its original dignified grandeur.

Every so often I get to visit the room and photograph the room and its contents. See other photos of the Capt. Thos. Espy Post and related Civil War activities at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Independence Day

flag and flowers
flag and flowers

Independence Day

It’s Independence Day in the United States. Now that the threat of rain has passed, my flag is displayed in my garden on its makeshift pole. It’s the flag they gave us at my father’s funeral, the one they give to veterans of the armed services, and it’s 4′ x 8′, far too large to easily display any other way. I’m not hosting or attending a cookout, nor planning to watch fireworks, instead I’m celebrating my independence as a citizen in this country by enjoying my home, working in my garden, doing a little work for tomorrow, in other words engaging in my inalienable right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, grateful that I live in a country where I can do that.

I honor those who fought for our status as a sovereign nation governed by a democratic process, and work to ensure it remains that way by participating in the democratic process every chance I get, especially when I go back to read the reasons those original founders saw fit to risk their lives for freedom.

~~~~~~~

IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.–Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.
He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.
He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.
He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.
He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.
He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.
He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary powers.
He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.
He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance.
He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislatures.
He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil power.
He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their Acts of pretended Legislation:
For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:
For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States:
For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world:
For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent:
For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury:
For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences
For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies:
For taking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws, and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments:
For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.
He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us.
He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.
He is at this time transporting large Armies of foreign Mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty & perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation.
He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands.
He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

Nor have We been wanting in attentions to our Brittish brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War, in Peace Friends.

We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

~~~~~~~~

The text of the Declaration of Independence is not copyrighted because it was composed by the American government and is the property of the American people.


First Bouquet

flowers in teapot
flowers in teapot

First Bouquet

Beginning with the first flowers I keep flowers gathered from the yard in vases on my front porch. It’s much too dark to grow anything and I appreciate the color and enjoy arranging the wild and hybrid flowers all through the summer. Everything is late in blooming this year and last weekend I finally had some forsythia to add to the vase by the door, and I had so few daffodils I didn’t want to cut them. But today the forget-me-nots were blooming in earnest along with the flowers from turnips that had wintered over, a welcome bright yellow.

This “vase” is one of my old teapots, the red enamel one I grew up in which my mother made tea each night to go with dinner. It sprung a leak but I have kept it, placing a jar inside it to hold the water and flowers. It’s on the swing on my front porch. I don’t mind sharing my swing with flowers.

Below is a photo of just the flowers, so pretty in afternoon sun; I didn’t realize I hadn’t caught the left side with the bold shadows on the arm of the swing. I love shadows as you can see above on the seat of the swing. Here’s one of the early photos from last year, but not that it’s from April 8, much earlier than now.

Turnip flowers and forget-me-nots.

Turnip flowers and forget-me-nots.


Snowflakes in a Jar

SnowflakesInJar

SnowflakesInJar

An interesting still life.

The jar holds the dried remains of textile dye I had used to paint fabrics. The jar is not airtight so they slowly dried, leaving a residue of both the pigment and the salts used to stabilize them in the form of those lovely snowflakes inside the jar.

The day was dark and rainy, but the outdoors still held the best light to be able to catch this. The chair and its peeling paint become a part of the scene.


Someone Got Your Goat? 2009

Someone got your goat?

I see no small amount of similarity between these two…perhaps it’s the expressions.

As much as I love my woods and streams, I love to photograph the city. On my occasional trips into Pittsburgh, the camera is always in hand. I’m always sensitive about photographing people, but this guy really didn’t mind.

 


Pinball Mural

mural for pinball headquarters
mural for pinball headquarters

Mural

The world headquarters of the the Professional & Amateur Pinball Association are in Carnegie, PA, in one of the old industrial parks. This is the mural on the back of their building. This building used to be plain cinderblock and brick, and this colorful and professional mural is a welcome change. Even the Jersey barriers, placed there because vehicles would regularly misjudge the distance and hit the building, are painted with colorful images. I doubt anyone hits these things now!


Fountain

photo of fountain

Fountain

I liked the shape of this fountain to begin with, and then as I walked toward it to take a closer look the dark wall moved in behind it just as the sun hit the moving water. I couldn’t have asked for a better shot.

This fountain is at The Barn where I’ve been moving some of my art and merchandise recently.


La Cueva de las Manos: 2010

photo of la cueva de las Manos

La Cueva de las Manos by Marcela K.

Graffiti? No—it’s 10,000-year-old art in a cave in Argentina. I get goosebumps when I look at the photos.

What an incredible signature to leave behind, it’s so joyful, as if these women and children are waving at us through all the millennia letting us know that things will at least turn out as they should. Life wasn’t easy that long ago, and if they could take the time to do this while hunting and gathering, we should hardly complain when we can’t get a signal for the cell phone.

No, I didn’t run off on a South American vacation! Marcela K., a tutor and translator in Buenos Aires, Argentina, commented on one of the photos on this blog. When someone visits me, I visit them, and on scrolling through her blog I saw these photos and read her narrative of her trip to this place. We were right in the middle of our big snowstorms, but her photos and description of walking through the parched, arid region to get to this cave took me away from all that.

Then I saw this photo and read about the hands. I’ll let her take it from there on her blog, Marcela in English, in 729 Hands Painted. She describes the landscape, the history, and how the hands were painted, plus other paintings in the caves. Below, she sent along another photo that isn’t in her photo essay. The hands look like children’s hands.

photo of cave of painted hands

One more photo of the painted hands by Marcela K.

And while you are there, Marcela recommends other photo narratives of other sites in Argentina she’s visited. From deserts to glaciers to a rose garden in the city—I had no idea Argentina was so diverse in regional weather. She also has an entry about the Chilean earthquake since they two countries are right next to each other.

Perito Moreno Glacier, Santa Cruz

Rosedal in Buenos Aires (a park full of roses in my city)

Quebrada de Humahuaca, Jujy (Part 1)

Quebrada de Humahuaca, Jujuy (Part 2)

So as we head into what may be a long, cool, wet spring, enjoy a little vacation in Argentina, compliments of Marcela.


Interesting Weather

homes, church rainbow

Passing Storm

The sun breaks through storm clouds and highlights the steeples of St. Mary’s Church and creates a rainbow over McKees Rocks, PA.

I’ve wanted to photograph this church for years, its steeples rising far above the industrial buildings around it as it stands before a hillside of homes. I knew I wanted to capture the moment when sunlight illuminated the steeples and crosses as the church would stand out against the landscape.

Today was an oddly warm January day, all of yesterday’s snow washed away by heavy rains and warm winds whipping the trees in all directions, clouds racing at all levels across the sky. I was lost in what I was actually looking for but found the tiny intersection of brick streets where the church stood. Watching the coming storm knew there was a chance I’d get the photo I wanted so I abandoned the junkyard I’d been looking for in order to purchase a back window for my Ford Escort and raced for the best vantage for the church with the hill of homes behind it as the rain battered my car and the plastic over the missing back window opening flapped in the wind.

Following the contour of the land I wound around a tight little suburban street and found a spot where I could see the entire valley except for a privacy fence in someone’s yard. I waited in my car until the rain began to slow and I could see the brilliant pale yellow light spilling out from the edge of the storm cloud. The clouds continued to move to the east, behind the church, forming the perfect deep purple backdrop made even darker as the light increased. The sun finally washed over the church and the houses on the hill and…

…a huge, perfect rainbow! Rainbows can be prosaic, used as symbols for far too many things, but this was truly the rainbow after the storm, simply a result of the conditions, interpret it as you will. I only had my little point and shoot, but I held it as high above the fence as I could as the last of the rain soaked my hair and jacket, hit the focus button and took a few shots.

McKees Rocks is a pretty rough and tumble place to say the least. On the outskirts of Pittsburgh, heavily industrialized and settled by thousands of East Europeans the mills and manufacturing were built along the Ohio River and in the valley where the rail lines followed the flood plain along Chartiers Creek. Houses were built on narrow winding streets clinging to hillsides, and the huge square-block-sized Catholic and Orthodox churches built in the center of each neighborhood. Along with the mills went the jobs and much of what is there has fallen into disuse, buildings are condemned, neighborhood assistance programs spring up to help those who live there now.


The Bonfire

bonfire

Bonfire

Sparks rise, spiraling and shooting in a thick column resembling a sculpture as more wood is added to the bonfire at the Panhandle Trail Night Walk last weekend.

The event is always fun to photograph with over 100 carved jack-o-lanterns and over 100 kids in costumes. This year, despite the first really cold night, kids and parents and just plain visitors dressed up and walked the quarter mile of trail with lit jack-o-lanterns and the bonfire was especially inviting. The lack of a moon made photographing the jack-o-lanterns nearly impossible but the photos still turned out interesting. Thanks to my photo assistant, Rayni! Click here to see a slideshow from the event.


A Lincoln Portrait

photo of David Conrad with musicians

Reading "A Lincoln Portrait"

David Conrad read the spoken portion of Aaron Copland’s  A Lincoln Portrait at Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall in Carnegie as well as a poem by Samuel Hazo, Jr. accompanied by Their Blossom’s Down.

David also composed his own detailed and moving tribute to libraries, including comments on the good and bad of Andrew Carnegie and the strength and character of the immigrants who gave Carnegie his wealth and therefore built his libraries. David is actually from Pittsburgh and knows the stories of the region like those of us who grew up here. I was particularly moved because my mother’s parents, particularly her father, learned to read at that very library, taught by his daughter, my mother’s older sister, who graduated salutatorian in her class at Carnegie High School…in a ceremony held on that very Music Hall Stage. Oh, the connections.

A Lincoln Portrait has long been one of my favorite pieces of music, brief though it is, but hearing it live, spoken by Conrad’s rich, sincere voice, music performed by the Duquesne University Wind Ensemble conducted by H. Robert Reynolds was almost more than I could take. I always tear up during the piece whenever I hear it, but hearing it live was a totally new experience. I photograph events for my local public library, this among them, and almost forgot to take photos during this. Interesting considering that is what I typically do when I am moved by something—photograph it!

You can see more photos of this performance in the photo gallery on the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall’s website under A Lincoln Portrait with David Conrad and H. Robert Reynolds. Also please browse the entire Photo Album on this facility’s website—I maintain this gallery and all the photos are those I’ve taken at events and just on daily visits. This is “my” library which I’ve been visiting since I was a child, and while they are one of my customers for commercial art I also visit for the sake of books and attend performances in the music hall.


La Cueva de las Manos

photo of la cueva de las Manos

La Cueva de las Manos by Marcela K.

Graffiti? No—it’s 10,000-year-old art in a cave in Argentina. I get goosebumps when I look at the photos.

What an incredible signature to leave behind, it’s so joyful, as if these women and children are waving at us through all the millennia letting us know that things will at least turn out as they should. Life wasn’t easy that long ago, and if they could take the time to do this while hunting and gathering, we should hardly complain when we can’t get a signal for the cell phone.

No, I didn’t run off on a South American vacation! Marcela K., a tutor and translator in Buenos Aires, Argentina, commented on one of the photos on this blog. When someone visits me, I visit them, and on scrolling through her blog I saw these photos and read her narrative of her trip to this place. We were right in the middle of our big snowstorms, but her photos and description of walking through the parched, arid region to get to this cave took me away from all that.

Then I saw this photo and read about the hands. I’ll let her take it from there on her blog, Marcela in English, in 729 Hands Painted. She describes the landscape, the history, and how the hands were painted, plus other paintings in the caves. Below, she sent along another photo that isn’t in her photo essay. The hands look like children’s hands.

photo of cave of painted hands

One more photo of the painted hands by Marcela K.

And while you are there, Marcela recommends other photo narratives of other sites in Argentina she’s visited. From deserts to glaciers to a rose garden in the city—I had no idea Argentina was so diverse in regional weather. She also has an entry about the Chilean earthquake since they two countries are right next to each other.

Perito Moreno Glacier, Santa Cruz

Rosedal in Buenos Aires (a park full of roses in my city)

Quebrada de Humahuaca, Jujy (Part 1)

Quebrada de Humahuaca, Jujuy (Part 2)

So as we head into what may be a long, cool, wet spring, enjoy a little vacation in Argentina, compliments of Marcela.


Looks Like the Holidays

Window with Victorian holiday decoration

Simple Holiday Decoration

I stopped at a traffic light and saw this lovely set of windows, beautiful in any season with its original wooden shutters, carved half-posts between the windows and colorful opaque stained glass lights at the top, but so tastefully decorated and I wondered if in the building’s youth before the turn of the century the Victorian-era resident had chosen a similar theme, candles on the windowsill inside, swags and bright red bows on the sill outside. The building is tall and narrow and so plain; next to this window is a simple paneled door and upstairs two individual double-hung windows without colored glass lights, a little bit of gingerbread around the eaves and that’s it. But I’ve often wondered at the room behind that marvelous window.


Saks Fifth Avenue

Saks Fifth Avenue

Saks Fifth Avenue

The title says it all, but here it has a great view of a secion of the city reflected in its front windows.


Look Up! The Peaks of the City

Old and New

US Steel Tower and Presbyterian Church on Strawberry Way

Pittsburgh has a mix of tall and short, gothic and modern, stone and steel in its skyline, and on a perfectly clear autumn day even minor details are enhanced by shadows. I typically enjoy photos of the contrast of gothic archictectural influence from the mid industrial age when buildings could have no undecorated spot with the streamlined ultra modern influence from the height of the steel era.

Stylistic Contrast

Stylistic Contrast

Look up and see the gargoyles staring down at you!

Gingerbread and Gargoyles

Gingerbread and Gargoyles

Sometimes a convergence of details comes together and simply provides a nice varied view.

Ornate

Ornate

Old Church Roofs and Towers

Old Church Roofs and Towers

Medieval Battlements

Medieval Battlements

 

 

 

Two views of the same church, actually seen from the back on Oliver Avenue.

 

 

 

And, finally, just an interesting facade.

Nice Facade

Nice Facade


Someone Got Your Goat?

Got Your Goat

Got Your Goat?

I see no small amount of similarity between these two…perhaps it’s the expressions.

Someone Got Your Goat?

Someone Got Your Goat?

As much as I love my woods and streams, I love to photograph the city. On my occasional trips into Pittsburgh, the camera is always in hand. This particular day I knew I’d be attempting to photograph Heinz Field while the Steelers played the Packers (no one would ever call me a sports fan of any sort, but I’ll photograph an event), so the good camera went with me.

I also like the distance view because in this one, the gentleman is such an anachronism!

I’ll have several other photos to post from this city visit as well as a subsequent one. On the original visit, I was dropping artwork at a gallery for a show. On the second visit, I went to the opening at night, and the city at night is really beautiful.