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Posts tagged “Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall

Story Time

Story Time
Story Time

Story Time

I’m not much for stuffed toys but I think this little sofa looks totally inviting.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Fine Detail

Fine Detail
Fine Detail

Fine Detail

I’ve been spending some time there lately, taking photographs of an upcoming performance, so it’s only natural that I photograph the grand building itself. The late afternoon sun at an angle had just the right amount of highlight and shadow to show up all the Italianate filigree on the Music Hall entrance, including the “C” medallions for “Carnegie” between the doors.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Details

detail of metal scrolling
detail of metal scrolling

Details

Details of wrought iron scrolling from a railing.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Christmas Book Tree

Christmas Book Tree
Christmas Book Tree

Christmas Book Tree

It’s a Christmas gift to all readers—but it’s all year round and you don’t even have to celebrate Christmas to enjoy it! And it’s free—visit your local public library!

This is the book tree from Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall from last year. Somehow I never posted this photo!

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Reaching Light

light through window across stage
light through window across stage

Reaching Light

Sunlight flows into a hidden window behind the stage and reaches through the backstage curtains make its mark upon the stage. It seemed to be reaching right for me.

On stage at Carnegie Hall, at Andrew Carnegie Free Library in Carnegie.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Watching Autumn Arrive

trees and wicker chair

Watching Autumn Arrive

An empty chair faces the trees, just tinged with yellow and orange, a blue haze to separate.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Stage Ready

darkened stage
darkened stage

Stage Ready

I just like stage scenes.

Do you suppose the instruments are talking to each other? And the chairs?

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Conversation Around the Fire

ink sketch of civil war reenactors in camp
ink sketch of civil war reenactors in camp

“Conversation Around the Fire”, ink, 7″ x 10″ © Bernadette E. Kazmarski

I had the chance to do one field sketch at yesterday’s reenactment event as the 9th Pennsylvania Reserves took a break from maneuvers to warm up and just have a good conversation with hot coffee around the fire. I had intended to sketch maybe two people, and maybe one or two ladies in dresses, when I’d visualized the sketches I’d like to get based on past events, but it was so cold and windy not too many people were standing around outside. This is done in ink on multi-media paper.

 


A Cold Day in April

civil war reenactors
civil war reenactors

A Cold April Afternoon

Just a few photos from yesterday’s Civil War Living History event at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. I always look for one that works well in sepia, and this group from the 9th Pennsylvania Reserves huddled around the campfire that sputtered in the wind worked well, especially when I got to an angle where no houses could be seen on the hill in the distance.

Below a young re-enactor wears a period dress and crocheted sontag to match and her hair tucked into a light snood with a young lady’s headpiece made by her mother as she gazes out a window of the Capt. Thos. Espy Post on the dim and cold afternoon.

young lady civil war reenactor

Young Lady

And we had a surprise guest—Andrew Carnegie himself, or so it seemed!

andrew carnegie reenactor

Andrew Carnegie himself came to visit.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Images of Living History

civil war re-enactors waiting around cannon
civil war re-enactors waiting around cannon

Waiting

Each year Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall hosts a living history event in remembrance of the Civil War, guided by the Library & Music Hall’s own Civil War expert, Espy Post Curator Diane Klinefelter, and including the 9th Pennsylvania Reserves in uniform as docents and re-enactors. Other re-enactors also take part as well as historians and vendors of all sorts to share their knowledge of this time in our country’s history. This year’s event is Saturday, April 5, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. I have information about this year’s event below. I’ll be there taking photos as usual, and possibly doing some sketches.

confederate re-enactor drummer boy

Drummer Boy

In April 2011 and April 2012, as part of the commemoration of the 150th Anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War, ACFL&MH also hosted re-enactment events held in Carnegie Park where re-enactors encamped and staged historic battles. I photographed these two events at the Library & Music Hall and at Carnegie Park, as I have photographed these living history events for years. I was so moved by the solemnity and dignity of the re-enactors. Some of the images have stayed with me since that time and I’ve been wanting to share them in an exhibit since then.

adjutant's tent at civil war event

Adjutant’s Tent

I did my best to capture as many as possible without modern anachronisms such as cars, surrounding homes and electrical wires as well as visitors in street clothes and re-enactors using cell phones. These eight photos reflect just a few memorable sights from those events.

Here are the photos in the exhibit

Flyer for Living History Exhibit civil war

Flyer for Living History Exhibit

Mid-day Meal

Powder Boy

Adjutant’s Tent

Drummer Boy

Waiting

Catching the Cadence

The First Shot

Bucktails

Thanks to Maggie Forbes and Diane Klinefelter for giving me the opportunity and the place to hang this exhibit.
Framed prints are for sale at $75.00 each; $25.00 of each sale is donated to ACFL&MH. Unframed prints are for sale at $25.00 each.

This exhibit joins two other exhibits in the Reception Hall, “Of Harps and Fig Leaves” and “Carnegie Photographed”.

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Schedule for the Living History Event

Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall 2014 Civil War Living History Day – April 5, 2014

Ongoing – 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

 Tours of the Capt. Thomas Espy Post, 2nd Floor

Guns of Gettysburg Display, Studio – “B”

Photo Exhibit – Petersburg & The Crater, Library – 1st Floor

Civil War authors book signings, Reception Hall – 2nd Floor

Sutlers, Studio – “B”

Food Court, Music Hall Lobby – 1st Floor

Civil War Used Book Sale, Studio – “B”

Co. A, 9th PA Reserves drills, Outdoors West Lawn

Touring Stations: Civil War Medicine, Infantry, Artillery, Recruiting, Studio – “B”

11:00 AM
Music Hall– 1st Floor, “The Dead Lay All About – Gettysburg: the Aftermath”, Kristopher D. White

1:00 PM
Reception Hall – 2nd Floor, “Sweet Glory: a novel”, Lisa Y. Potocar

3:00 PM
Music Hall– 1st Floor, Almost Famous Bluegrass Band Steven Moore & Friends

10:30; 12:15; 1:45 PM
Chartiers Cemetery Tours of the GAR Section, Shuttle in front of Library Steps


Looking Forward to Spring

tulips in book vase on vintage table
tulips in book vase on vintage table

Looking Forward to Spring

Vintage and fresh, and bright sunlight, it’s what spring is all about. Looks like it might be a painting too.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Repeating Patterns

pattern and shadow
pattern and shadow

Repeating Patterns

A pattern designed over 100 years ago can still make its mark in today’s world.

One of the antique theater seats from the Music Hall at Andrew Carnegie Free Library in Carnegie.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


“In This Valley”, Thanks for Being There

me with my art
me with my art

Me with my art.

Usually I read all new works at my poetry readings, but this event was also part of the celebration of Carnegie’s 120th year so my poems focused specifically on sites and events in Carnegie. I read, as usual, 12 poems, two of which were new, one written specifically for this reading to an audience of about 30 people, friends, family, and others who I’d never met.

I always introduce the theme and give a brief narrative for each poem before reading it, and a summary afterward. My readings also include an exhibit of art and photographs and while this is also mostly new, this exhibit was taken from my collection of photos and sketches from around town in a collection I call “My Home Town” as well as most of the 32 photographs in the collections “Of Harps and Fig Leaves” and “Carnegie Photographed” which are a permanent exhibition in the Reception Hall. This year it included a few new street sketches, paintings and photos and note cards on display from the set “My Home Town” and “Eye on the Sparrow”. Two pieces were borrowed from their owners, all the rest are for sale, both originals and prints.

art exhibit

The full display of art for this exhibit.

Much of what I do is inspired by the place I live as I’ve walked the trails and streets of Carnegie and the surrounding area, watching the land and people change from my childhood. Most of my poems began with something I saw, which often has multiple levels of inspiration for me and can inspire many different works. I photograph everything I possibly can and I may never use that photograph but sometimes it becomes a work in its own right. Then it may immediately or later become a sketch or painting, then possibly a poem and even some times a short story. You’ve seen and read the beginnings of these many times here on Today.

snow falling in old cemetery

Snow in the Cemetery

I ordered the poems according to the time frame they referred to. It’s interesting to see how the context of reading a poem can change my own reading of it and the poem’s reception. For instance, I read August 28, 1941 the first year I wrote it in all seriousness, despite the sometimes comical notices included in the classified ads that made that poem, in the face of the imminent world war. Last night reading the prices and products and comments from that era provided natural humor for everyone in the audience that felt completely appropriate and perhaps the last line referring to the storm on the horizon was even more gripping after our laughter.

Several poems were about or referred to things that I’d…found in the trash, and why they were found in the trash was part of the reason I included them and wrote a new poem. Many homes around town had been owned and occupied by only one family from the 1930s or 1940s to today, and contain a lot of things people kept for various reasons, things that tell a story about life in that house, and the eras the house was occupied, typical of Carnegie and towns like it. August 28, 1941 was one of those poems, and a new one entitled The Cabinet for a cabinet made in 1946 which I’d found during the time my mother was critically ill, and because WWII was “her” era the carefully handmade cabinet had touched me deeply, thinking of someone returning from overseas with all the pain and trauma and trying to get back to “normal” life.

belted kingfisher

Kingfisher on a branch watching the water for fish.

The kingfisher I saw the other day, though, was what brought it together for me, and I wrote a poem focused on the changes that have been and those to come for Carnegie, and gave a narrative about what the kingfisher means in ecology and how our change from industry to small businesses had made a positive change in our landscape we probably hadn’t realized, cleaning up the very creek that was the reason Carnegie had been founded where it was so long ago, and that the kingfisher symbolizes the rebirth from winter to spring, transition and adventure, and hope that Carnegie is in for some positive change after all we’ve done to build and rebuild our town in this valley.

As I have done with past poetry readings, I will post the poems and images in a virtual reading on my website. The artwork will remain in the Reception Hall until the end of March. And hopefully I’ll finally have my newly-printed poetry books!

I was so excited and comfortable at this reading that I felt it was my best yet of all six. Thanks to Maggie Forbes, executive director of the ACFL&MH for hosting me.

I read these poems, those that appear here are linked and you can read many others at allpoetry:

Snow in the Cemetery

Vintage

Bridal Wreath

August 28, 1941

The Cabinet

My First Decision

Memorial Day Parade

After the Flood

Dogwoods

Flocks of Children

The Kingfisher

tables of art and cards

Detail of what’s on the tables.

And here’s a slideshow of some of the art that’s there:


In This Valley Poetry Reading and Art Exhibit

In This Valley Poetry Reading and Art Exhibit
In This Valley Poetry Reading and Art Exhibit

In This Valley Poetry Reading and Art Exhibit

In This Valley

Poetry Reading and Art Exhibit

Thursday, March 6, 2014, 7:00 PM

Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall, Reception Hall, 2nd Floor

Library Avenue, ink sketch

Library Avenue, ink sketch

As a part of the celebration of Carnegie’s 120th year, I will share poetry and art inspired by my home town. The program is free and a reception follows the reading.

West Main Street, original pastel

West Main Street, August Afternoon, original pastel

Much of what I do is inspired by the place I live as I’ve walked the trails and streets of Carnegie and the surrounding area, watching the land and people change from my childhood. I’ll be reading about a dozen poems, some of which I’ve presented in prior poetry readings, and a selection of new works.

View from Beechwood, acrylic painting

View from Beechwood, acrylic painting

I’ll also have some familiar paintings and prints as well as recent sketches, paintings and photographs and I’ll have a selection of note cards on display from the set “My Home Town”. In addition, a selection of my photographs from the collections “Of Harps and Fig Leaves” and “Carnegie Photographed” will also be part of the exhibit.

Table of Glass, original pastel

Table of Glass, original pastel

You can see samples of poetry and art from my prior poetry readings at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall by visiting the poetry page on my website.

If you’re local, I hope to see you there!

main street carnegie

Main Street at Twilight, photo


Waiting

row of antique chairs
row of antique chairs

Waiting

A row of antique bentwood chairs awaits the long-dead members of the Capt. Thos. Espy Post in the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall; these quiet chairs in somber light speak of lives past.

The chairs, the quarter-sawn oak panels, glass-front bookcases holding books that chronicle the Civil War are all authentic, left behind from the members of this post room, opened in 1906. The carpet is a printed replica that resembles the scraps of carpet surviving around the edges of the room. Once there were over 7,000 posts for members of the Grand Army of the Republic all over the country, now there are only six, and this one is possibly the most intact, and lovingly restored to its original dignified grandeur.

Every so often I get to visit the room and photograph the room and its contents. See other photos of the Capt. Thos. Espy Post and related Civil War activities at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Iron Heat

cast iron radiator
cast iron radiator

Iron Heat

Do you want to guess what this is?

Okay, it’s a cast iron radiator at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall, catching the afternoon sun at just the right angle to highlight all the gingerbread decoration. A purely functional thing, but so beautiful.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Relic No. 48: Cotton

photo of cotton boll on exhibit
photo of cotton boll on exhibit

Relic No. 48: Cotton

This is one of the relics in the Capt. Thos. Espy Post No. 153 of the Grand Army of the Republic at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall.

Among other things, I’ve been photographing the artifacts for documentation and to use the images for the newsletter, for signage, to accompany press releases and many other purposes to let the public know the room exists and holds treasures.

And while I do this for the Library & Music Hall at other times, this week it’s in recognition of the first shot fired in what would become the American Civil War, 150 years ago yesterday, April 12, 1861.

Why is some dirty old cotton a cherished relic in this historic room? Luckily, the Post members published a Catalogue of Relics in 1911, naming and describing each of the exhibits held in the room. Not all of them are relics from the war itself; many of them are simply things the members found interesting or particularly moving, as with this cotton boll:

48—COTTON

Was picked from the cotton bushes in 1881 by W. H. H. Lea, late Lieutenant of Co. I, 112th Reg., Pa. Vols., while on a visit to the Virginia battlefield, from the narrow strip of ground between the Union and rebel lines and directly in front of the rebel fort at Petersburg, Va., blown up July 30, 1864. Over this ground the charging columns passed. Almost every foot of this ground was covered with Union dead or stained by as brave blood as ever flowed from the veins of American soldiers. Has been in possession of W. H. H. Lea for 25 years. Secured from him January, 1906, for Memorial Hall.

He was so moved by his visit to this battlefield, and his memories from the war, that he picked this handful of cotton from the battlefield, brought it home and held onto it for 25 years until he felt he had a safe place to keep it, tacking it to velvet-covered cardboard. Such are the things that carry memories.

“Memorial Hall” was their name for the Espy Post as they saw the room to be the holding place for “the paraphernalia, books, records and papers belonging to said Post and all relics of the late Civil War now in possession of said Post, or hereafter acquired; …”.

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You’ll see this photo and many others I’ve taken of the Capt. Thos. Espy Post in an article The Civil War Picket outlining the room’s content, origins and functions and meaning the society of the day. Read “Intact GAR relics-meeting room in Pa.: A singular spot to share their war experiences” by Phil Gast: http://civil-war-picket.blogspot.com/2014/01/intact-gar-relics-meeting-room-in-pa.html

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Foreboding

Crystal chess set
Crystal chess set

Foreboding

It does look like a scene from a cemetery. Maybe it’s the bare trees in the background.

But it’s just the crystal chess set at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall in Carnegie. A kind patron donated it, and it does look grand on the century old oak library table. It migrates around, but the building was built to catch as much light as possible from the tall windows, so even on a dark day like this, it reflects the light and casts interesting shadows on the table and on its own glass board.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Between the Curtains

stage curtains
stage

Between the Curtains

The stage awaits the performers, looking from stage left between the curtains.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Conceptual Christmas Tree

corinthian columns in library
corinthian columns in library

Conceptual Christmas Tree

It’s one of the columns in the library with the fancy Corinthian frills at the top, red light shining from one direction, green from another.

We’re getting ready for the big event at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall tomorrow, and all the fancy lighting is set all around the house. It’s the annual benefit, read about it on the website, and join us if you can!

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


At the Window

woman in civil war dress
woman in civil war dress

At the Window

Remembrance Day commemorates the anniversary of the 1863 Consecration of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg during which President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, always held on a weekend near the actual date of November 19, 1863. The Capt. Thos. Espy Post No. 153 of the GAR is open for tours each Saturday from 11 to 3, but today we as part of our Remembrance Day activities we welcomed back Diane Klinefelter as the curator for the post, and she also gave tours today in authentic dress. Our mayor gave a presentation and reading of the Gettysburg Address.


Antique and Vintage

violin on an oak table
violin on an oak table

Antique and Vintage

A violinist laid down her antique instrument on a vintage oak table just long enough for me to get at least one interesting photo. She was performing in the orchestra for the Pittsburgh Savoyards’s production of Princess Ida in the Music Hall at at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall in Carnegie. The performance was excellent, such incredible voices and such an intimate Hall, and Gilbert & Sullivan may seem silly and frilly but hear live they never cease to amaze me with the depth of their lyrics and themes. The table is one of the original tables installed when the Library & Music Hall opened in 1901.

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On a related note, literally, I watched a brief video about people in Paraguay who live on and make their living from a garbage dump who create musical instruments from garbage and formed an orchestra.

“The world generates about a billion tons of garbage a year. Those who live with it and from it are the poor – like the people of Cateura, Paraguay. And here they are transforming it into beauty. Landfill Harmonic follows the orchestra as it takes its inspiring spectacle of trash-into-music around the world….”

Please visit the website for Landfillharmonic, watch the video and read about these amazing people making beauty with garbage.

I will never complain about lacking materials or creative space again.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Getting Ready for Gilbert and Sullivan

stage set under construction
stage set under construction

Set Building

It may look like a big mess, but the stage set is under construction at Andrew Carnegie Free Library’s Music Hall in Carnegie, being prepared for the Pittsburgh Savoyards’ performance of Princess Ida. I’ve never liked recordings of these shows, but I discovered I love the productions live, and this is the 75th year the Savoyards have been performing G&S. the sets are always detailed—I think I see some stonework in progress at the bottom, the voices are spectacular and the music is a live orchestra. Read more about the Music Hall and about the Pittsburgh Savoyards.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


“The Jewel on the Hill” and “Spring Dusk on Main Street”

building on hill at dusk
building on hill at dusk

The Jewel on the Hill, Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall

Walking home through Carnegie on this date in 2005, carrying just my little 2MP digital camera that didn’t even have a zoom and a small lightweight tripod, I managed to photograph two of my favorite photos of all the photos I’ve taken, above, “The Jewel on the Hill”  and below “Carnegie at Dusk”. Though I’ve got plenty of photos to share, and even newer ones from Carnegie, today I’ll celebrate these two, two of the photos that convinced me to take another, closer look at my photography.

So we call this treasure in our town so named for its builder, the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. This is actually an older photo but with a story, plus I recently installed an exhibit of photos of this facility at this facility, which is also one of my favorite places to go and which is also one of my regular customers for freelance design work. Quite a lot of connections.

Anyway, this photo is one we’ve used repeatedly as the signature image for the facility, and was a real stroke of luck and timing. I was walking home on a clear, warm spring dusk in late April, 2005, April 24 to be exact, and arrived at the bottom of Library Hill at just this moment. The sky was fading from brilliant turquoise to cobalt, the still-bare trees were etched against it in silhouette, and the grand building itself stood partially lit by the sunset but with all interior and exterior lights on, solid and stately, serving its public in its 104th year. By the time I had snapped a half dozen or so shots the light had changed completely and the moment was gone. That was part of the timing, the other part that they had only temporarily installed the foundation lighting but never used it again, and this was part of what gave the building that lovely definition against the dark hilltop. A few minutes earlier or later, the previous or following week, and this photo would never have existed. And it was taken with my first little point-and-shoot 2MP digital camera—I don’t know how it came out as clearly as it did!

Read about the exhibits and find links to slideshows of the images at “Of Harps and Fig Leaves” and “Carnegie Photographed”.

A little background on the names…in 1894 the leaders of two small communities on either side of Chartiers Creek, Mansfield and Chartiers, decided to merge in order to provide better services as one community instead of two individual administrations. Andrew Carnegie, who had owned a mill in Carnegie, had by then sold off his mills and begun spending off his worldly wealth by building libraries. These town leaders had a proposal, that he build a library and a high school for the new community and they’d name it after him. He did build the library but said they were on their own with the high school; nonetheless our town is named “Carnegie” in his honor.

He also set up the Library itself a little differently from the others he’d had built. Where others are named “(name of town) Carnegie Library” or “Carnegie Library of (name of town)” and were built with his expense but maintained by the community, this Library bears his full name and given an endowment for its maintenance. Also, more than just the Library space, a Music Hall was incorporated into the design along with a gymnasium in the full basement.

You can read all about this unique facility on its website at www.carnegiecarnegie.org. I’ll also mention that the website design is mine, and you’ll see many more of my images in the photo album.

photo of main street at night

Spring Dusk on Main Street