an everyday photo, every day | photography • art • poetry

Posts tagged “bees

Autumn Sweetness

image

Inspired by bees getting an early start, busily gathering pollen in these early days of autumn.

Copyright (c) Bernadette E. Kazmarski


Got That Pollen, Heading Home

Got that pollen and taking it home.
Got that pollen and taking it home.

Got that pollen and taking it home.

Someone’s headed off to the hive with stash of pollen! How many bees do you see here? And in all the other photos? One of them has five bees on these crocuses! These crocuses were humming with bees as was another clump of them, and as long as the sun was shining the bees were very, very busy.

I photographed this back on April 1 when I photographed the “one white crocus” and forgot to share it then. It’s nice to have spring-blooming flowers you can enjoy, but it’s far better for the bees to be able to find an good meal in early spring. Crocuses, which sometimes bloom even earlier, even during a late spring thaw when bees often awaken in the warmth, are rich in pollen and are easily found by bees. Never underestimate the value of any blooming flower to help keep bees alive—you can help with very little effort in your own back yard.

See other of my posts on helping bees in your own back yard and in encouraging wildflowers in your area.

. . . . . . .

All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Raspberries in the Bloom

Raspberry in the Bloom
Raspberry in the Bloom

Raspberry in the Bloom

This is a raspberry long before you find it on the stem. Just opened this morning some of its features may look like another common flower, the rose, the family to which the raspberry belongs. It has a ring of five tiny petals but that puffy center and the unopened bud next along with the leaves, though larger bearing the same compound structure with tiny sawtooth edges, and those thorns.

A raspberry is a compound fruit like a blackberry, raspberry, mulberry and many other berries which are clusters of “drupes”, which sounds like an insult but simply refers to a seed with a fleshy outer covering. Looking at that center part, that ring of stamens around the outside has to get in touch with the fluff of pistils in the center in order for each drupe to be pollinated so you find that perfect hemisphere of juicy blobs that, all clustered together, make up a raspberry. The plant itself can take care of some of this, but not all, and if you’ve ever seen a raspberry with a few blobs missing, this is why.

raspberries

Ready to Eat

What’s all this talk about bees lately? Apparently the Little Green Bee is a specialist pollinating raspberries. Didn’t see any about this morning, but I do know they visit here pretty regularly. Possibly that’s why, though I don’t have too many raspberry plants, the berries are very successful.

little green bee on blue vervain

Little Green Bee

Personally, I can already taste the raspberries some morning soon, still cool from overnight.

More black raspberries in a vintage cup.

Berries in a Cup

 

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.

All images in this post are copyright © Bernadette E. Kazmarski and may not be used without prior written permission.


“Everything Is Connected”

bumblebee on vervain by bernadette e. kazmarski

Save Your Native Bees

The flower of a tomato plant has the pollen so tightly held on the anther that it takes the vibration of a bumblebee to loosen it. The bee becomes dusted with the golden treasure, and leaves that flower for the next flower, spreading this elixir of life for tomatoes while gathering some for his own family back at the hive.

After WWII, when we began monocropping larger and larger farms, we used all the new pesticides invented during the war to kill off all the “weeds” in the fields which were too large to work by hand and making it easier for farmers to grow and harvest huge amounts of food. But the “weeds” were native wildflowers that fed the bees, that pollinated those fields.

I listened to a speaker tell us about all the ways bees make life on earth possible. Bees, yes, the ones we may be frightened of stinging us, the ones we don’t want building nests in our attics, the ones we wave away at picnics, the ones that are disappearing all over the globe and no one understands why.

I heard Marla Spivak in a segment entitled, “Why Are Bees Disappearing?” on the TED Radio Hour, which offers three or four segments of TED Talks under one topic, this one being “Everything Is Connected”.

If you garden, you know know these things, but many people do not. You can make a difference with your own back yard, letting your grass and cultivated plants mix with or be replaced by native species. I did this, and rather than being criticized and fined for a messy overgrown yard, my neighbors and visitors describe it as “lush” and “like a park”. And I am rewarded with this…

blue vervain

Evening Purple Dance

The delicate purple spikes of blue vervain bloom in the quiet time of the summer, elegant and dignified among the frenzy of production in my vegetable garden. One of my favorite wildflowers for its color and its sweet blooming, blue vervain was a volunteer in my garden, finding my little space acceptable to its needs.

In return I am rewarded with watching native honeybees visit to collect pollen, knowing I am at least doing a bit in the effort to save them by maintaining a wildness about my yard. I watched this bee march all the way around each little circlet of flowers before moving on to the next circlet.

honeybee on blue vervain

Save the Bumblebees

And purple and green below—my favorite color combination! Looks like it might be Euglossa dilemma or a Little Green Sweat Bee, but I don’t know my bees all that well. The tiny spiders have taken up residence as well. In fact, blue vervain is native to most of North America and along with the flowers attracting important pollinators, the seeds are also important through the winter for songbirds, and the plant is the larval host for the common buckeye butterfly and it has a long history of medicinal use for humans. Refer to this USDA document to read more.

little green bee on blue vervain

Little Green Bee, also an important pollinator.

Please feel free to copy and past this image with a link back to this post. Here’s another post with bees and wildflowers.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Evening Purple Dance

blue vervain
blue vervain

Evening Purple Dance

The delicate purple spikes of blue vervain bloom in the quiet time of the summer, elegant and dignified among the frenzy of production in my vegetable garden. One of my favorite wildflowers for its color and its sweet blooming, blue vervain was a volunteer in my garden, finding my little space acceptable to its needs.

In return I am rewarded with watching native honeybees visit to collect pollen, knowing I am at least doing a bit in the effort to save them by maintaining a wildness about my yard. I watched this bee march all the way around each little circlet of flowers before moving on to the next circlet.

honeybee on blue vervain

Save the Bumblebees

And purple and green below—my favorite color combination! Looks like it might be Euglossa dilemma or a Little Green Sweat Bee, but I don’t know my bees all that well. The tiny spiders have taken up residence as well. In fact, blue vervain is native to most of North America and along with the flowers attracting important pollinators, the seeds are also important through the winter for songbirds, and the plant is the larval host for the common buckeye butterfly and it has a long history of medicinal use for humans. Refer to this USDA document to read more.

little green bee on blue vervain

Little Green Bee, also an important pollinator.

Please feel free to copy and past this image with a link back to this post. Here’s another post with bees and wildflowers.

bumblebee on vervain by bernadette e. kazmarski

SaveYourNativeBees

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Busy Bumblebee

A Busy Bumblebee
A Busy Bumblebee

A Busy Bumblebee

I love to see these pollinators out in force, here visiting both bugle weed and forget-me-nots.


The Busy Bees

sunflower with bees
sunflower with bees

The busy bees on the sunflower.

Three busy honeybees carry out their duties on these bright sunflowers.

These sunflowers were planted along someone’s driveway in an area where I was driving today. I quickly checked behind me, pulled over and rolled my window down, reluctant to get out into the heat. I got several good shots, but didn’t see the bees until I opened this one at home.

Happy bees, and happy sunflowers!

You just never know where or when you’ll find beauty.