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Posts tagged “bird nest

Closed for the Season: Songbird Nest

frozen bird's nest
frozen bird's nest

Closed for the Season

All the summer birds have flown, leaving their homes behind. Next year the couple who built this nest will return and refresh the materials, but for now it stands open to the elements, collecting snow and rain, some animal fur and perhaps its own down loosened and waving in the wind.

In walking along Chartiers Creek this day, I found at least a half-dozen nests of this type, usually only one per tree, and the trees were most often seated in the crook of sapling branches about 5 to 10 feet above the ground, growing at the top of the creek’s banks.

I wouldn’t guess which species of nest this might be, but it would be a songbird because it is small, cup-shaped and placed in a tree, and likely the bird would be a insect-eating bird because this area, in summer and fall, would be full of mosquitoes, gnats, moths, butterflies and other types of flying insects, day and night.

If you have an idea what type of bird the nest might belong to, please leave a comment.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Turn Up the Heat on That

bird nest in branches, saturated
bird nest in branches, saturated

Turn Up the Heat

I decided to play around a little more with “Holding Pattern”. Now it looks like a summer bird’s nest with an egg in it.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Holding Pattern

Holding Pattern

Holding Pattern

A songbird nest, filled only with cold snow, is snugly held not only in the reaching twigs of Japanese knotweed along the creek but also in the overall crisscross pattern the branches make from a certain angle.

Right on both sides of the solstice, the days seem uniformly short and the nights long, and often the weather, however it chooses to express itself, is incessant as we take on a holding pattern as well.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Closed for the Season: Songbird Nest

Closed for the Season

Closed for the Season

All the summer birds have flown, leaving their homes behind. Next year the couple who built this nest will return and refresh the materials, but for now it stands open to the elements, collecting snow and rain, some animal fur and perhaps its own down loosened and waving in the wind.

In walking along Chartiers Creek this day, I found at least a half-dozen nests of this type, usually only one per tree, and the trees were most often seated in the crook of sapling branches about 5 to 10 feet above the ground, growing at the top of the creek’s banks.

I wouldn’t guess which species of nest this might be, but it would be a songbird because it is small, cup-shaped and placed in a tree, and likely the bird would be a insect-eating bird because this area, in summer and fall, would be full of mosquitoes, gnats, moths, butterflies and other types of flying insects, day and night.

If you have an idea what type of bird the nest might belong to, please leave a comment.


Living Spaces: 2011

Bird's nest in front of house

Living Spaces

One of my avian neighbor’s homes is lit by the late afternoon sun with my human neighbor’s house in the background.

Both homes weathered the winter pretty well. This nest is a robin’s nest, and their construction ability never ceases to amaze me considering they have a beak and claws to carry and manipulate construction materials, including dirt to make the hardened insides. From what I can see, they build a bowl of sturdier grasses, twigs and sometimes interesting items like a watchband or the plastic markers I use to mark seedlings in my garden. Then they add a layer of mud, and impress softer materials like finer grass, feathers and the odds and ends of colored yarn I toss out in the yard for that purpose, into the mud as it dries. This nest hangs over the street and aside from residential traffic a pretty good gust will blow past, plus all the ice and snow we’ve had this winter. Soon they’ll be back to clean it up and the nest will be back in business.


Living Spaces

Bird's nest in front of house

Living Spaces

One of my avian neighbor’s homes is lit by the late afternoon sun with my human neighbor’s house in the background.

Both homes weathered the winter pretty well. This nest is a robin’s nest, and their construction ability never ceases to amaze me considering they have a beak and claws to carry and manipulate construction materials, including dirt to make the hardened insides. From what I can see, they build a bowl of sturdier grasses, twigs and sometimes interesting items like a watchband or the plastic markers I use to mark seedlings in my garden. Then they add a layer of mud, and impress softer materials like finer grass, feathers and the odds and ends of colored yarn I toss out in the yard for that purpose, into the mud as it dries. This nest hangs over the street and aside from residential traffic a pretty good gust will blow past, plus all the ice and snow we’ve had this winter. Soon they’ll be back to clean it up and the nest will be back in business.


Closed for the Season: Songbird Nest

bird nest in bare tree with snow

Closed for the Season

All the summer birds have flown, leaving their homes behind. Next year the couple who built this nest will return and refresh the materials, but for now it stands open to the elements, collecting snow and rain, some animal fur and perhaps its own down loosened and waving in the wind.

In walking along Chartiers Creek this day, I found at least a half-dozen nests of this type, usually only one per tree, and the trees were most often seated in the crook of sapling branches about 5 to 10 feet above the ground, growing at the top of the creek’s banks.

I wouldn’t guess which species of nest this might be, but it would be a songbird because it is small, cup-shaped and placed in a tree, and likely the bird would be a insect-eating bird because this area, in summer and fall, would be full of mosquitoes, gnats, moths, butterflies and other types of flying insects, day and night.

If you have an idea what type of bird the nest might belong to, please leave a comment.