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Posts tagged “daffodils

Angelic Morning, poem in progress

Angel Wings

Angel Wings

Winter is finally is beginning to give over to spring, and I am finding flowers in my yard. We all walk through difficult times and feel as if spring will never come, but it does, and in fact is always there hidden by what we expect to see. Sometimes all we need to do is look around us, and there it is.

The words came to me inspired by the beauty in this humble spring morning. Below is a slideshow of other photos that inspired these words.

Angelic Morning

So much is wrong
So much is sad
So much cannot be fixed
The detritus of the past lies all about
But I find also diaphanous angel wings filled with eternal sunshine
Bright smiling eyes of faeries
Reflecting the tranquil blue of the sky’s protective arch
The old daffodil has stories to tell
And joy appears in the most common of things
Beauty, good, exist in every moment
Like the stars in daylight
Always shining
Seen best in the darkest hour.

poem “Angelic Morning” © Bernadette E. Kazmarski

Read other poems and poems in progress.

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Morning Song

daffodils
daffodils

Morning Song

We had a bit of sun this morning, and these daffodils were singing their song until the storm got to them.


Daffodils, Finally

daffodils in bud
daffodils in bud

Daffodils, Finally

At least one clump of daffodils has dared to act as if spring might be here.


Reaching for Spring

daffodils pushing through leaves
daffodils pushing through leaves

Reaching for Spring

The daffodils sprouted—today! I saw the leaf litter was lifted a bit yesterday, but no trace of green. Today, the sun touched the tips; the crocused, squills and tulips had also pushed aside the leaves but none looked so much like fingers reaching for the light as the new daffodils.


Daffodils in a Row: 2010

three daffodils

Daffodils in a Row

I’ve taken so many photos of daffodils this spring—after the snowy winter where they were protected under a heavy blanket of snow, then slowly watered as the snow melted, they were encouraged by the warm weather to push forth, form buds and bloom! Even though they are a little later than usual, they certainly caught up with their usual schedule.


Vintage Daffodils: 2011

yelow daffodils

Vintage Daffodils

Years ago if visited the site of an abandoned farm with friend who had discovered it, and the place was like a wonderland of leftovers and memories from decades of people loving their land and working very hard.

The farmland had been sold and was due to be cleared and “made ready” for development. The wooded hillsides, the partly-overgrown upper fields, the packed clay roads from one pasture to another, the locust posts still sound and straight would all disappear.

The barn still stood, though it was hardly sound. Barns carried tons of weight in livestock and stuff for livestock and are generally built the sturdiest of any building on the land and last a long time past nearly anything else. Off in the woods was an old chicken coop, still smelling just a bit like chickens, but obviously made from hand-hewn boards. We knew this would be either plowed under or sent to a landfill and we wanted to salvage as much wood as we could, but the three of us couldn’t easily carry even one of the 12-foot 2x10s and knew that cutting them would be impossible. Some of the artifacts we found in the barn, empty food tins and old tools, told us the farm had probably been there since the mid-nineteenth century.

But the most magical thing was the spot where the house had been. There was no trace of the building, but a rectangle of open green grass remained, surrounded by a riot of forsythia and lilacs and rhododendrons and roses ready to bloom and crocuses and stars of Bethlehem and so many other plants just sprouting, as if they were all waiting for the house and the people who had loved them so much to come back, and wouldn’t fill in the empty spot just in case they would reappear some day. I was moved to tears at the generations of people who worked hard on their traditional farm, but also loved their flowers and surrounded their house with color and scent.

And there were these daffodils, bright yellow and “doubled” as flowers are called when they sprout extra rows of petals. Doubled is an understatement—they have so many rows of petals I couldn’t count, and each flower takes several days to fully open. They were clustered around the house and barn, here and there in the dim under trees, but they most joyous display was all along the road that curved up from the barn to the upper pasture, a riot of daffodils that would have accompanied the person on the tractor or leading the cows, as winter led to spring and the hard work of farming began again in earnest, they would be cheered on by a long line of yellow flowers nodding and waving as if in applause. It must have taken decades for them to naturalize and fill in like that.

The daffodils were in full bloom when we were there on a sunny spring morning. Knowing it was all going to the backhoe, we decided to preserve this memory by taking as much as we could and filled our cars with buckets of daffodils, a few other plants, and my beloved dogwood, a native sapling the day I took it home, now proudly filled out and blooming with creamy flowers the size of dessert plates.

Every spring these daffodils still turn their faces to the sun and bloom enthusiastically, and I think of the people who loved and planted and nurtured these things and hope they know that someone found their little paradise and helped to salvage some of what they loved.


Throw Off Those Dead Leaves and Feel the Sunshine! 2010

daffodils coming up through leaves

Daffodils and Leaves

That’s it, even if there’s snow right behind you, stand up, throw off those old dead leaves, get your blossoms in order and feel the sunshine, and all those other cliches that still work! It’s a warm sunny day after a cold, snowy month.


Vintage Daffodils

yelow daffodils

Vintage Daffodils

Years ago if visited the site of an abandoned farm with friend who had discovered it, and the place was like a wonderland of leftovers and memories from decades of people loving their land and working very hard.

The farmland had been sold and was due to be cleared and “made ready” for development. The wooded hillsides, the partly-overgrown upper fields, the packed clay roads from one pasture to another, the locust posts still sound and straight would all disappear.

The barn still stood, though it was hardly sound. Barns carried tons of weight in livestock and stuff for livestock and are generally built the sturdiest of any building on the land and last a long time past nearly anything else. Off in the woods was an old chicken coop, still smelling just a bit like chickens, but obviously made from hand-hewn boards. We knew this would be either plowed under or sent to a landfill and we wanted to salvage as much wood as we could, but the three of us couldn’t easily carry even one of the 12-foot 2x10s and knew that cutting them would be impossible. Some of the artifacts we found in the barn, empty food tins and old tools, told us the farm had probably been there since the mid-nineteenth century.

But the most magical thing was the spot where the house had been. There was no trace of the building, but a rectangle of open green grass remained, surrounded by a riot of forsythia and lilacs and rhododendrons and roses ready to bloom and crocuses and stars of Bethlehem and so many other plants just sprouting, as if they were all waiting for the house and the people who had loved them so much to come back, and wouldn’t fill in the empty spot just in case they would reappear some day. I was moved to tears at the generations of people who worked hard on their traditional farm, but also loved their flowers and surrounded their house with color and scent.

And there were these daffodils, bright yellow and “doubled” as flowers are called when they sprout extra rows of petals. Doubled is an understatement—they have so many rows of petals I couldn’t count, and each flower takes several days to fully open. They were clustered around the house and barn, here and there in the dim under trees, but they most joyous display was all along the road that curved up from the barn to the upper pasture, a riot of daffodils that would have accompanied the person on the tractor or leading the cows, as winter led to spring and the hard work of farming began again in earnest, they would be cheered on by a long line of yellow flowers nodding and waving as if in applause. It must have taken decades for them to naturalize and fill in like that.

The daffodils were in full bloom when we were there on a sunny spring morning. Knowing it was all going to the backhoe, we decided to preserve this memory by taking as much as we could and filled our cars with buckets of daffodils, a few other plants, and my beloved dogwood, a native sapling the day I took it home, now proudly filled out and blooming with creamy flowers the size of dessert plates.

Every spring these daffodils still turn their faces to the sun and bloom enthusiastically, and I think of the people who loved and planted and nurtured these things and hope they know that someone found their little paradise and helped to salvage some of what they loved.


Daffodils in a Row

photo of daffodils

Daffodils in a Row

I’ve taken so many photos of daffodils this spring—after the snowy winter where they were protected under a heavy blanket of snow, then slowly watered as the snow melted, they were encouraged by the warm weather to push forth, form buds and bloom! Even though they are a little later than usual, they certainly caught up with their usual schedule.


Throw Off Those Dead Leaves and Feel the Sunshine!

photo of daffodils pushing through leaves

Daffodils and Leaves

That’s it, even if there’s snow right behind you, stand up, throw off those old dead leaves, get your blossoms in order and feel the sunshine, and all those other cliches that still work! It’s a warm sunny day after a cold, snowy month.


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