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Posts tagged “Kane’s woods

Wildflowers of a Summer Evening

wildflowers
wildflowers

Wildflowers of a Summer Evening

Some flowers are spent, some are fully leafed and petalled and colorful. I posted a slide show to my “Wildflowers of the Lower Chartiers Watershed” collection, a hillside of wildflowers taken in warm evening sunlight at Kane’s Woods in Scott Township in early August a few years ago. The memory of these flowers warmed me in the cold snowy months of winter, and while I’ve used a few here and there in designing one thing or another I’ve never decided what to do with the collection.

Though I used my Pentax K10D, for the lens I used my favorite non-digital 35mm fixed-focus lens with the 1.5X converter which shortens the depth of field allowing me to focus on just one insect if I choose; this lens is probably 30 years old, but it never fails me. In this way, I can manage the foreground and background and simply focus on one object, and I can achieve those lovely random abstract effects with lighting and shapes.

A slide show, even without music, will have to do for now.

The flowers you see are echinacea or purple coneflower, and its rarer cousin yellow coneflower, wingstem, Virginia stickseed, fleabane, black-eyed susan, Queen Anne’s lace, catnip, goldenrod, ragweed, and curled dock. Some are in seed already, but they add their drama to the mix.

Please enjoy the show. You can click here to bring it up as a flash slideshow or visit “Wildflowers of the Lower Chartiers Watershed”, scroll down and choose Wildflowers for a Summer Evening, and be sure to take the time to enjoy a few others as well.

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All images in this post are copyright © Bernadette E. Kazmarski and may not be used without prior written permission.


Wildflowers of a Summer Evening

echinacea with bee
echinacea with bee

Wildflowers of a summer evening.

Don’t be concerned about the shriveled petals on this echinacea—some flowers are spent, most are fully leafed and petalled and colorful. I’ve posted a new slide show to my “Wildflowers of the Lower Chartiers Watershed” collection, a hillside of wildflowers taken in warm evening sunlight at Kane’s Woods in Scott Township last July. The memory of these flowers warmed me in the cold snowy months of winter, and while I’ve used a few here and there in designing one thing or another I’ve never decided what to do with the collection.

Though I used my Pentax K10D, for the lens I used my favorite non-digital 35mm fixed-focus lens with the 1.5X converter which shortens the depth of field allowing me to focus on just one insect if I choose; this lens is probably 30 years old, but it never fails me. In this way, I can manage the foreground and background and simply focus on one object, and I can achieve those lovely random abstract effects with lighting and shapes.

A slide show, even without music, will have to do for now.

The flowers you see are echinacea or purple coneflower, and its rarer cousin yellow coneflower, wingstem, Virginia stickseed, fleabane, black-eyed susan, Queen Anne’s lace, catnip, goldenrod, ragweed, and curled dock. Some are in seed already, but they add their drama to the mix.

Please enjoy the show. Visit “Wildflowers of the Lower Chartiers Watershed”, scroll down and choose Wildflowers for a Summer Evening.


Bonfire

close-up of fire

Bonfire

What a wonderful picnic get-together last night with the Scott Conservancy on the Kane’s Woods property, lots of food, a bonfire, perfect weather thanks to Jane, whose grant for a perfect evening was apparently approved. Difficult decision which photo do I post tomorrow—wildflowers? sunset? bonfire? moonrise? This of the bonfire was the one that caught my eye.

Photographing fire can be like photographing any other element that moves, such as waves, or rain or snow, but fire has the added attraction of being less than opaque.  A fast enough shutter speed will capture the flames without too much blur, but leave out all the other details. The trick is to focus on a fixed object that has  a little bit of light on it and the rest usually meters and falls into place.

I’ve actually photographed Kane’s Woods at other events and just when I visit to hike. You can use the following links to Wildflowers of a Summer Evening, taken at the 2010 picnic, Home Sweet Home also taken last year, and a winter post called Taking the Measure of a Tree, and especially a photo that links to a short video I took of water gurgling in the stream in the spring, A Walk in the Woods. Also explore slideshows on this site in special slideshows under Local Nature Walks.

I also have a few other photos of bonfires at events at conservation areas, Bonfire at Twilight at Wingfield Pines as we gathered to skate on a snowy night, and Sparks at a similar event at an earlier year.


Wildflowers of a Summer Evening

echinacea

Echinacea in the Evening Sun

I’ve posted a new slide show to my “Wildflowers of the Lower Chartiers Watershed” collection, a hillside of wildflowers taken in warm evening sunlight at Kane’s Woods in Scott Township last July. The memory of these flowers warmed me in the cold snowy months of winter, and while I’ve used a few here and there in designing one thing or another I’ve never decided what to do with the collection.

Though I used my Pentax K10D, for the lens I used my favorite non-digital 35mm fixed-focus lens with the 1.5X converter which shortens the depth of field allowing me to focus on just one insect if I choose; this lens is probably 30 years old, but it never fails me. In this way, I can manage the foreground and background and simply focus on one object, and I can achieve those lovely random abstract effects with lighting and shapes.

A slide show, even without music, will have to do for now.

The flowers you see are echinacea or purple coneflower, and it’s rarer cousin yellow coneflower, wingstem, Virginia stickseed, fleabane, black-eyed susan, Queen Anne’s lace, catnip, goldenrod, ragweed, and curled dock. Some are in seed already, but they add their drama to the mix.

Any of these images is available as a print or as a digital file you may use for design. I will be printing a set of greeting cards or at least note cards from them soon as well.

Please enjoy the show. Visit “Wildflowers of the Lower Chartiers Watershed”, scroll down and choose Wildflowers for a Summer Evening.