an everyday photo, every day | photography • art • poetry

Posts tagged “money plant

Lunaria

photo of lunaria
photo of lunaria

Lunaria

Lunaria for the full moon.

Honesty for its pure white color.

Money plant because we can all use a little extra now and then, and if we can grow it in the backyard, so much the better.

This plant has self-seeded since the first year I was here and planted some seeds in a flower bed. Now it comes up wherever it pleases and most of the time I let it because it’s so beautiful with spring’s pink or white phlox-like blossoms, and in the autumn when the seed pods dry and I peel them away to reveal the transparent pearly white membrane that once held the seeds apart in the pod.

At other times it really looks like an undesirable, its first-year floret of leaves resembling a thistle without the thorns, and in the time between blossom and seed looking like a struggling half-hybrid.

It is officially called Lunaria because of its color and shape resemblance to the moon, but every popular plant picks up familiar names.

So I have harvested this year’s money from the back yard and placed some for display and shared more this friends. That can’t be too bad either.


My Life Savings

lunaria plants
lunaria plants

My Life Savings.

These plants are, among other names, called “money plants” or “silver dollar plants” because these round bright green seed pods mature to a light tan and when the outer layers and seeds are removed what’s left is a thin, papery, translucent creamy-white sphere; because this also resembles a full moon, they are also called “lunaria”.

But the joke is on the money plants—they seed themselves all over the yard and this year are doing quite well. if I had this much in my pockets I’d be doing pretty well. But they also look lovely with the late afternoon sun shining through them, and beauty is priceless.


Money Grows on Plants

photo of lunaria

Lunaria

Lunaria for the full moon.

Honesty for its pure white color.

Money plant because we can all use a little extra now and then, and if we can grow it in the backyard, so much the better.

This plant has self-seeded since the first year I was here and planted some seeds in a flower bed. Now it comes up wherever it pleases and most of the time I let it because it’s so beautiful with spring’s pink or white phlox-like blossoms, and in the autumn when the seed pods dry and I peel them away to reveal the transparent pearly white membrane that once held the seeds apart in the pod.

At other times it really looks like an undesirable, its first-year floret of leaves resembling a thistle without the thorns, and in the time between blossom and seed looking like a struggling half-hybrid.

It is officially called Lunaria because of its color and shape resemblance to the moon, but every popular plant picks up familiar names.

So I have harvested this year’s money from the back yard and placed some for display and shared more this friends. That can’t be too bad either.