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Posts tagged “music

Cello On Stage

cello on stage
cello on stage

Cello On Stage

I saw a fun production of the operetta Die Fledermaus today with modern and localized interpretations incorporated in the performance. All the singers had too much of a good time.

Possibly the musicians as well. during the intermission one of the cellists set his cello on the stage just so. No one minded me sneaking into the orchestra pit to capture this shot of the cello and the music stand, just perfectly set. I only had my smartphone, not my DSLR, and it’s not very good with color, or focus or a lot of other things, but I can work with it if it’s all I have. In this case I used one of the built-in filters, “vintage”, that pushed the color and contrast faded the blacks to blues and greens and added a darkened fringe on the edges similar to “vignette” but not as pronounced.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Setup

bass and amp
bass and amp

Setup

The bass and its amp are ready and waiting for the musician to sit down and play. I had the chance to photography a performance at the music hall and I always like to get a few mood shots along with the rest. See a few more photos from “Turn Up the Heat”, performance by jazz vocalist Michele Bensen and the Bensen Burners here.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Stage Ready

darkened stage
darkened stage

Stage Ready

I just like stage scenes.

Do you suppose the instruments are talking to each other? And the chairs?

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Waiting for Showtime, 2012

instruments in stage light
instruments in stage light

Waiting for Showtime

Drums, guitar, bass and piano wait in the dimmed stage lights for the performance to begin.

I had the opportunity to photograph a performance last year, “A Gala Tribute to Joe Negri” at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. I’ve created a slideshow of the rehearsal, performance and party afterward which includes music from the performance. Click here to see the photos and listen to the music–and I think I’ll need to remix this in a newer style of slideshow for YouTube.

I’m also going to be catching up with a few other photos for the days I’ve missed since the concert. October is beautiful, even in the rain! (No, the jazz standard is “September in the Rain”).

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Christmas Celebration in the Midst of War

woman in red Victorian dress

Enjoying the Music

A musician enjoys others’ performances from the back of the orchestra.

Performed by the Pittsburgh Historical Musical Society and referring to the Civil War, we are still in the midst of war and celebrating Christmas today.

They played timely folk, classical and holiday music as would have been played in a Christmas concert during the Civil War, many of the musicians in period dress, as seen in the spectacular Victorian dress the multi-talented vocalist wore.

The Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall houses the Capt. Thos. Espy Post 153 which in turn houses the reenactors of the 9th Pennsylvania Reserves of the GAR who maintain the collection and meet and host events in the post and at ACFL&MH. One of the musicians read letters written at Christmas by members of the 9th Pennsylvania as they were on the battlefields of the Civil War. One thing that was important to them, to make them feel closer to home, was music. In this case it was a mix of Pittsburgh-themed music, songs of Stephen Foster, short classical pieces popular at the time and Christmas hymns.

The photo below shows the vocalist’s entire dress, and if not for a few wires dangling here and there it could be mistaken for another time.

womans singing in Victorian dress

The Victorian Dress

 


1946 Wurlitzer Jukebox, 2011

inside the jukebox
photo of jukebox

1946 Wurlitzer “Bubbler” Jukebox 1015

This is an authentic, refurbished, fully-functional 1946 Wurlitzer Bubbler Jukebox 1015, complete with lava-lamp bubbles flowing through the tubes that circle around the front.

I stopped in D&J Records on Main Street in Carnegie where they specialize in vinyl recordings, 45s and LPs, and “oldies” depending on your era (a caller was asking for oldies from the 80s when I was in there, that’s not quite what the shop has in mind), and used recordings on vinyl, cassette and CD in all musical genres. I always find something on CD that I used to have on vinyl or cassette that I can add to my collection. They also have a lot of cool vintage stuff of a musical nature as well as advertising and household items.

Someone had actually purchased this and stopped in to see it and plan on how to move it—it’s heavier than a refrigerator—and to choose the music to go into it. It’s sold with 300 reissued 45s; it was originally meant to play 78s, but when they had it reconditioned it they had it converted to play 45s.

As they had posted with the jukebox:

In 1946, after the end of World War II, Wurlitzer introduced it’s Model 1015 Jukebox. Building supplies had become available again, and it was the “1015- Bubbler” that brought the near- bankrupt Wurlitzer Company great success.The “1015-Bubbler”, is without a doubt the most popular jukebox of all time.

The 1015 Wurlitzer actually was influenced from more of an art deco style, with its illuminated, color-changing pillars, 8 bubble tubes, shiny chrome and domed top

Even though the Wurlitzer Model 1015 was produced from 1946 to 1947, it was the popularity of this jukebox model that kept many of them still bopping along right into the 50’s. It’s this longevity, that is responsible for the “Bubbler” being associated with the romanticized 1950’s sock-hop era.

45-RPM records were becoming so popular that by 1954 the Wurlitzer factory had to introduce a conversion kit for the 1015- Bubbler, just so they could play 45s.

I truly love the details of things manufactured in those years, the crossover from the decorative details of the Art Deco era to the post-war minimalism of “modern” design, that mix of chrome and sunbursts, wood and glass.

And inside, as if to promote the idea of the fantasy dance band, behind the turntable and “stack” of records is a stage with an imitation cardboard stage curtain.

The Wurlitzer and the shop are both gone now…

inside the jukebox

Inside the jukebox.


Waiting

violinist sitting at bottom of stairs
violinist sitting at bottom of stairs

Waiting

One actual photo (of many) from today’s Living Room Concert, the violinist sitting on the steps and listening while the oboeist played his piece with the piano, the long angles of the sun catching the scroll and neck of her violin and illuminating her bow, casting a long shadow on the floor.


Sketches: The Living Room Concert

ink sketch of musicians
ink sketch of musicians

The Living Room Concert, 7″ x 10″, ink © B.E. Kazmarski

Live music is more special than can be described, no matter the genre. Like seeing an original painting, watching musicians perform a program of music can’t be equaled  in any recording.

And hearing it in the comfort of someone’s living room makes it all the better, with no real distance between the performers and the listeners. It’s really the way music was meant to be appreciated.

This was another concert of the “Living Room Chamber Music Project” in Pittsburgh, this time at a friend’s  house. Feeling more comfortable in this venue I carried my Big Bag of Art Materials intending to sketch if I could, if the muse was with me and I wouldn’t distract or interrupt the musicians or the audience. And so she was with me while I produced three sketches and lots of ideas for paintings and possibly collaboration. I love to sketch musicians while they play, letting their performance and the music itself carry me along.

The group has two pianists, Billie Jo Miller and Jack Kurutz, who play at alternate times and act as page turners for each other and sometimes play piano four hands, and a violinist, Ashley Buckley, an oboeist, Lenny Young, and a vocalist who did not perform here tonight because she is in another performance. I thoroughly enjoyed the entire concert, but hearing Spiegel im Spiegel live had me spellbound.

pencil sketch of musicians

Schumann, pencil, 9″ x 7″ © B.E. Kazmarski

pencil sketch of musicians

Pièce, pencil, 7″ x 8″ © B.E. Kazmarski

Read about another concert by these musicians, and more about chamber music.


Autumn Scene With Piano, 2009

piano with chrysanthemums
piano with chrysanthemums

Autumn Scene With Piano

The stage is ready and it’s just a few moments before the musicians, who had just been rehearsing and goofing off about 30 minutes earlier, would arrive on stage in their dress black for the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall’s 2009 benefit performance of Daphne Alderson singing “All Judy, All Heart”. Here the concert grand is ready, with a colorful cluster of mums and sunflowers.

I love photographing performances and still stage scenes like this are rare to get. While the overall tones are autumnal with orange and yellow and bronze bathed in the yellow of the dimmed lights, yet the piano, the drums, microphone, even the floor and the post on the left are touched by a gentle wash of the red and blue stage lights ready for the performance, above.

It’s also in my exhibit “Of Harps and Fig Leaves” featuring images of this place, where it’s called “Autumn Expectations”.


Waiting for Showtime, 2011

instruments in stage light
instruments in stage light

Waiting for Showtime

Drums, guitar, bass and piano wait in the dimmed stage lights for the performance to begin.

I had the opportunity to photograph a performance last weekend, “A Gala Tribute to Joe Negri” at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. I’ve created a slideshow of the rehearsal, performance and party afterward which will ultimately include music from the performance. Since this will be a few more days, I can’t wait to show some of the photos. When the full presentation is up I’ll post another image with a link to the slideshow.

I’m also going to be catching up with a few other photos for the days I’ve missed since the concert. October is beautiful, even in the rain! (No, the jazz standard is “September in the Rain”).


1946 Wurlitzer Jukebox

photo of jukebox

1946 Wurlitzer "Bubbler" Jukebox 1015

This is an authentic, refurbished, fully-functional 1946 Wurlitzer Bubbler Jukebox 1015, complete with lava-lamp bubbles flowing through the tubes that circle around the front.

I stopped in D&J Records on Main Street in Carnegie where they specialize in vinyl recordings, 45s and LPs, and “oldies” depending on your era (a caller was asking for oldies from the 80s when I was in there, that’s not quite what the shop has in mind), and used recordings on vinyl, cassette and CD in all musical genres. I always find something on CD that I used to have on vinyl or cassette that I can add to my collection. They also have a lot of cool vintage stuff of a musical nature as well as advertising and household items.

Someone had actually purchased this and stopped in to see it and plan on how to move it—it’s heavier than a refrigerator—and to choose the music to go into it. It’s sold with 300 reissued 45s; it was originally meant to play 78s, but when they had it reconditioned it they had it converted to play 45s.

As they had posted with the jukebox:

In 1946, after the end of World War II, Wurlitzer introduced it’s Model 1015 Jukebox. Building supplies had become available again, and it was the “1015- Bubbler” that brought the near- bankrupt Wurlitzer Company great success.The “1015-Bubbler”, is without a doubt the most popular jukebox of all time.

The 1015 Wurlitzer actually was influenced from more of an art deco style, with its illuminated, color-changing pillars, 8 bubble tubes, shiny chrome and domed top

Even though the Wurlitzer Model 1015 was produced from 1946 to 1947, it was the popularity of this jukebox model that kept many of them still bopping along right into the 50’s. It’s this longevity, that is responsible for the “Bubbler” being associated with the romanticized 1950’s sock-hop era.

45-RPM records were becoming so popular that by 1954 the Wurlitzer factory had to introduce a conversion kit for the 1015- Bubbler, just so they could play 45s.

I truly love the details of things manufactured in those years, the crossover from the decorative details of the Art Deco era to the post-war minimalism of “modern” design, that mix of chrome and sunbursts, wood and glass.

And inside, as if to promote the idea of the fantasy dance band, behind the turntable and “stack” of records is a stage with an imitation cardboard stage curtain.

inside the jukebox

Inside the jukebox.


A Tribute to Joe Negri Slideshow

tribute to Joe Negri

At rehearsal, Tom Wendt (from back), Joe Negri, Michelle Bensen, Max Leake, Tony DiPaolis.

It’s all together now, music and everything, the slideshow from the performance.

We welcomed Joe Negri and and his quartet for the “A Gala Tribute to Joe Negri on October 1, 2011 at Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. His quartet includes Max Leake on piano, Tony Dipaolis on bass and Tom Wendt on drums. Special guests included Michelle Bensen on vocals, Sean Jones on trumpet, Mike Tomaro on saxophone and Roger Humphries on drums.

I simply enjoy photographing performers, and I know the hall and stage of this Music Hall so well, even in the dark, tiptoeing around with my camera, trying not to disturb the audience during one of the silent moments of a piece of music, just to get the shot I envision. The lighting on this performance was particularly interesting, and I enjoyed the first set of photos with the violet glow during the rehearsal, and that red background during the performance.

You also get to see the glitterati who attended as we had the largest crowd for a benefit we’ve ever had, nearly 400.

Unfortunately, my 70-200 zoom quit communicating with my camera just after Mike Tomaro came onto the stage, so I didn’t get all the dramatic close ups I usually get during a performance. That lens is f3.5, a little better in low-light situations. The 18-35mm zoom is an f4.5, not very good in low-light and everyone is too far away when I’m photographing during a performance. That left my good old 50mm lens, the original from my Pentax K1000, totally non-digital but an f1.8 and great if I don’t need a zoom. It’s still the best lens I have and saved the day.

You can see this slideshow on Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall’s website in Photo Album under “About Us”. You can go directly to the slideshow here, but please browse the other photo slideshows which are also my work, as is the design of the website itself. In addition, please visit their page on my website to browse newsletters, post cards, posters and other items I’ve designed for them. This is my beloved local public library, the place I’ve been visiting all my life to read and take out books, do research, and just to hang out in big beautiful old building—it’s now one of my customers. I couldn’t be happier to use my skills and talents to help enhance the facility’s image as it moves through its capital campaign to renovate for the first time in over 100 years.


Orchestra

orchestra

Orchestra

In photographing a performance I caught this angle of the 70-piece orchestra; the final timpanist with all the fun noisemakers is out of the frame at the bottom, but I caught the kettle drums.

This orchestra is students from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, accompanying performers from the Duquesne University Opera Workshop as they act their final dress rehearsal for their two-part performance of Puccini one-act operas Suor Angelica and Gianni Schicchi at Andrew Carnegie Free Library in Carnegie. Their performances are amazing, and it’s difficult to believe they are students.


Autumn Scene With Piano

The piano awaits the performers

The piano awaits the performers

The stage is ready and it’s just a few moments before the musicians, who had just been rehearsing and goofing off about 30 minutes earlier, will arrive on stage in their dress black for the Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall’s 2009 benefit performance of Daphne Alderson singing “All Judy, All Heart”. Here the baby grand is ready, with a colorful cluster of mums and sunflowers, bathed in the yellow of the dimmed lights and barely touched by the red and blue stage lights above.