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Posts tagged “pasture rose

Bloom Again in Autumn, 2011

pink rose
pink rose

Bloom Again in Autumn

The pink pasture rose blooms again in autumn, surrounded by so many buds it will be November before they are all done. I was lucky to find it in such magical light at an angle that caught the shadows of the buds on the outside of the flower, showing through the translucent petals.

Purchase a print in a variety of styles and sizes or a greeting card from my Fine Art America profile: Bloom Again In Autumn


Small Roses

pastel sketch of roses in a vase
pastel sketch of roses in a vase

Small roses, pastel, 8″ x 6″, 2001 © B.E. Kazmarski

Just one little sliver of sunlight crept through the blind and that was all it took to illuminate these old roses in a tiny glass vase. I stood in my kitchen and sketched this as quickly as possible before the light changed.

These are roses that I grow, am unbelievably bright pink pasture rose and an ancient deep red sweet-smelling climbing rose. Blooming plentifully in June, I placed them in an inexpensive glass bowl; they fall apart rather quickly but I still wanted to enjoy them indoors. I had prepared a number of drawing surfaces on old pieces of mat board, this being a combination of gesso and marble dust applied in a thick impasto, leaving deep brush marks for whatever I drew on it.

Here is a photo of the pink pasture rose.

I sell a print of this as a signed digital canvas print of an original pastel painting, gallery-wrapped on wooden canvas stretchers with black paint covering the sides, ready to hang or frame as you choose. The original was 8″ x 6″, but canvas stretchers are difficult to find smaller than 8″ so I just make a slightly larger print and gallery wrap it. I can also make an original size print and wrap it around a piece of 1/2″ gatorboard. I can also make other size prints as well, and I offer it as a greeting card in one of my collections. Find it in my Etsy shop.


Pink Pasture Roses

pink pasture roses
pink pasture roses

Pink Pasture Roses

My pink pasture roses are enthusiastically blooming. They are an old-fashioned native rose, brilliant pink but “single”, meaning they have only one row of petals, five in total in that row. Their thorns, a mix of short, medium and long and all needle sharp, line their stems as numerous as salt grains on a pretzel, and I, typically gloveless in every situation, will don gloves when I cut a bouquet to put in the vase by my door. The scent of roses can be cloying and even heavy, but these roses smell light and fresh, like a clean June morning. Unhybrid and totally native, they are as tough as the clay they will grown in. This rose was in the yard when I moved in, and may have been here for decades; in my experience all those old roses were a tough bunch, disappearing under the lawnmower’s blade only to reappear the next year, or sprouting up in an untended yard where they had been long forgotten.

They fall apart rather quickly when cut, but I still do to enjoy them near me. Years ago I did a small quick daily sketch of a bunch of these and my red climbing roses


Bloom Again in Autumn

pink rose

Bloom Again in Autumn

The pink pasture rose blooms again in autumn, surrounded by so many buds it will be November before they are all done. I was lucky to find it in such magical light at an angle that caught the shadows of the buds on the outside of the flower, showing through the translucent petals.


Pink Pasture Roses

pink pasture roses

Pink Pasture Roses

My pink pasture roses are enthusiastically blooming. They are an old-fashioned native rose, brilliant pink but “single”, meaning they have only one row of petals, five in total in that row. The thorns line their stems as numerous as salt grains on a pretzel, and I, typically gloveless in every situation, will don gloves when I cut a bouquet to put in the vase by my door. The scent of roses can be cloying and even heavy, but these roses smell light and fresh, like a clean spring morning. Unhybrid and totally native, they are as tough as the clay they will grown in. This rose was in the yard when I moved in, and may have been here for decades; in my experience all those old roses were a tough bunch, disappearing under the lawnmower’s blade only to reappear the next year, or sprouting up in an untended yard where they had been long forgotten.