an everyday photo, every day | photography • art • poetry

Posts tagged “public art

Stripes

stripes
stripes

Stripes

This was very welcome today. Morning was bright and sunny but afternoon grew overcast, and we’ve seen enough of that. Below is another view that may give you a clue what this is.

The sun comes over the hills.

The sun comes over the hills.

And below is what it really is, and another reason it’s welcome—not only the color but the resting place for walking up this hill.

This is where the colored slats are.

This is where the colored slats are.

Near the top of this hill is another pretty bench.

A closeup.

A closeup.

They are painted by girl scouts.

This is who painted it.

This is who painted it.

And here is the bench.

The other bench, closer to the top of the hill.

The other bench, closer to the top of the hill.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Attending the Paintball Exhibit

The Paintball Exhibit
The Paintball Exhibit

The Paintball Exhibit

Traveling under the Bloomfield Bridge, you never know what you’ll find. Here, Mr. Top Hat Metal Sculpture sits in the snow, shirtless to appreciate the skills of local paintballers in a modern-day Jackson Pollock style. Would Pollock have thrown balloons full of paint onto a canvas if he’d had the chance? I’ll bet he would have.

metal sculpture

Mr. Top Hat

Above is the shirtless Mr. Top Hat Metal Sculpture today, and below from a photo I took of the same sculpture almost three years ago in the summer when someone had taken pity on his bare metal in the sun and given him cover.

metal sculpture

Mr. Top Hat in summer

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Murals of Yesterday and Today

mural
mural

Three guys on bench.

I visited a customer in Homestead, PA today, and parked next to these murals, on the side of a building on a side street. I could only find the name and artist for one, but I will surely find information on the rest.

The pear trees were blooming and traffic was passing so I couldn’t get a clear shot of any of them. However, I liked the young pear tree with its blossoms as part of this photo, delicately decorating the mural of the three bench guys and even intermingling with the faded painted remnants of the shop sign on the brick wall.

tile mural

Mural of individually painted tiles.

mural

Entrance to the Monongahela Valley

Very art deco. as the Monongahela River pours out of the bottom of the painting.

homestead strike

“1892”, the year of the Homestead Strike

Homage to the Homestead Strike in 1892.

"Jitney"

“Jitney”

Mural of individually painted tiles.

Murals of individually painted tiles.

homestead mural

“Homestead” by Ian Green

This is the only mural about which I could find any identification. It’s on a second-story fire escape, and it’s as if the woman is standing there, with her child.

mural

Man coming home from work.

This mural of a man apparently coming home from work, taking off his hard hat as he climbed the fire escape; if you looked across the street from it at the right angle, the railing in the painting mimics the actual railing of the fire escape.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Life Imitating Art: 2010

photo of vines on a building

Life Imitates Art

Ivy and honeysuckle obligingly grow out of strategic areas on the mural painted from ground to roof on the side of this building in Mt Washington, in Pittsburgh.

It’s really cool to look at, but I do hope they remove the vines or it will damage and eventually cover the mural.