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Posts tagged “sunflowers

Diner Greeting Committee

sunflowers
sunflowers

Diner Greeting Committee

Especially welcome on a rainy day.

The photo was so dull and underexposed I did major manipulations to color and contrast, and then applied a “poster edges” filter in Photoshop. I photographed it thinking it would make a good watercolor someday but wasn’t sure I could pull it off with all the colors so dull, now I think it will be okay.

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Saturday Smiles

yellow sunflower
yellow sunflower

Lemon Smile

I encountered the last of a row of exuberant sunflowers on my way back from the post office this morning. I wish I would have had my DSLR to blur out some of those backgrounds and get even more dramatic closeups, but these are fine. Enjoy!

orange sunflower

Orange Smile

Yellow sunflower in shadow

Shy Smile

russet sunflower

Russet Smile, with a little green bee.

four sunflowers

Smiling Quartet

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


With Bowed Heads

row of sunflowers in December
row of sunflowers in December

With Bowed Heads

A row of sunflowers turn their faces to the ground at the end of their season.


This Is Not A Sunflower, 2011

single false sunflower with bud

False Sunflower with bud for next in line.

Actually, it is a false sunflower, but of all the woodland sunflowers I saw this weekend on the Panhandle Trail, I liked this one the best. Those five petals are so deliberate that they are difficult to ignore, and remind me of a wind turbine. Most sunflowers have petals, or rays, all the way around the central disk, but this one has apparently chosen, by genetics, to have only five. this variety, Heliopsis helianthoides, can have anywhere between five and eight. All the plants in this area with similar leaves and stems had five rays, yet in other areas along the trail, I know I’ve seen others with six rays and more. I guess they each have their own territory.

And the photo below is interesting in its own right. I use several different lenses when I photograph wildflowers, and I also manually change the settings, shooting “dark” so that I get all the highlights in the petals where the sun highlights them, for instance, while the background detail fades to focus interest on the flower. I usually have to adjust the levels when I get into PhotoShop, to lighten it up a bit. Often, I’ll simply choose “auto levels” and see what happens. I rarely like what it does—it’s usually too contrasty for me—but it often shows me elements of the image I wouldn’t see otherwise, like this! This photo began with the same color ranges as the one above, but who would think there would be blue and purple in the background and no green? And that zappy yellow! I love the effect.

zappy sunflowers

Zappy Sunflowers


The Busy Bees

sunflower with bees
sunflower with bees

The busy bees on the sunflower.

Three busy honeybees carry out their duties on these bright sunflowers.

These sunflowers were planted along someone’s driveway in an area where I was driving today. I quickly checked behind me, pulled over and rolled my window down, reluctant to get out into the heat. I got several good shots, but didn’t see the bees until I opened this one at home.

Happy bees, and happy sunflowers!

You just never know where or when you’ll find beauty.


This Is Not A Sunflower

single false sunflower with bud
single false sunflower with bud

False Sunflower with bud for next in line.

Actually, it is a false sunflower, but of all the woodland sunflowers I saw this weekend on the Panhandle Trail, I liked this one the best. Those five petals are so deliberate that they are difficult to ignore, and remind me of a wind turbine. Most sunflowers have petals, or rays, all the way around the central disk, but this one has apparently chosen, by genetics, to have only five. this variety, Heliopsis helianthoides, can have anywhere between five and eight. All the plants in this area with similar leaves and stems had five rays, yet in other areas along the trail, I know I’ve seen others with six rays and more. I guess they each have their own territory.

And the photo below is interesting in its own right. I use several different lenses when I photograph wildflowers, and I also manually change the settings, shooting “dark” so that I get all the highlights in the petals where the sun highlights them, for instance, while the background detail fades to focus interest on the flower. I usually have to adjust the levels when I get into PhotoShop, to lighten it up a bit. Often, I’ll simply choose “auto levels” and see what happens. I rarely like what it does—it’s usually too contrasty for me—but it often shows me elements of the image I wouldn’t see otherwise, like this! This photo began with the same color ranges as the one above, but who would think there would be blue and purple in the background and no green? And that zappy yellow! I love the effect.

zappy sunflowers

Zappy Sunflowers