an everyday photo, every day | photography • art • poetry

Posts tagged “virginia creeper

Red, 2011

Red
Red

Red

Sometimes the scene is just visually stunning, especially with a little flash of angled late afternoon sun on that bright red Virginia Creeper. Love the peeling paint, the weathered wood, cloudy windows and the door hinge. Yet the plant flashes its brilliance before it fades after one season, while the building simply fades of many, many years.

This is from several years ago, but each October, on a day as warm as summer, I remember this moment and share it again.

You can find several different types of prints in my Etsy shop.

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All images used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission. Please ask if you are interested in using one in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of this image or a product including this image, check my Etsy shop or Fine Art America profile to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Red

virginia creeper on weathered door
virginia creeper on weathered door

Red

Sometimes the scene is just visually stunning, especially with a little flash of angled late afternoon sun on that bright red Virginia Creeper. Love the peeling paint, the weathered wood, cloudy windows and the door hinge. Yet the plant flashes its brilliance before it fades, while the building simply fades.

This is from several years ago, but each October, on a day as warm as summer, I remember this moment and share it again.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.

If you’d like a print of this photo on various materials—canvas, metal, acrylic, and more—it is available in my photography collection in my Fine Art America gallery entitled, simply, “Red”.

For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Not Fast Enough

virginia creeper leaves
virginia creeper leaves

Not turning fast enough!

The leaves aren’t changing fast enough for me so I did a little work on them. A Virginia Creeper vine grew up my deck post and while all the rest of it is turning it characteristic scarlet to red-violet, I’ve been waiting for this to turn red so I can photograph the light through it. It’s still green, so I photographed it anyway because I liked the way the leaves cast clear shadows on each other, and also tried it in black and white where it looks like a puzzle; these are below. And then I skewed the colors in Photoshop! I’ll make those leaves change when I want them to!

virginia creeper leaves

Bits and Pieces in actual color.

virginia creeper leaves

In black and white.

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For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms.


Red, 2011

photo of red leaves in front of garage door
virginia creeper on weathered door

Red

Sometimes the scene is just visually stunning, especially with a little flash of angled late afternoon sun on that bright red Virginia Creeper. Love the peeling paint, the weathered wood, cloudy windows and the door hinge. Yet the plant flashes its brilliance before it fades, while the building simply fades.

This is from several years ago, but each October, on a day as warm as summer, I remember this moment and share it again.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. 

If you’d like a print of this photo on various materials—canvas, metal, acrylic, and more—it is available in my photography collection in my Fine Art America gallery entitled, simply, “Red”.

For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Colors, 2011

autumn colors

Colors

Just this one red leaf in all those other colors. It’s from a Virginia Creeper vine that was mingling with the morning glories, though all the other leaves were still mostly green. But when the sun came out and touched this leaf it was as if the leaf itself was emitting the vibrant red.

I originally planned to crop out the morning glories thinking the red would be even more vibrant against all that green, its natural complement, and without the distraction of any other color in the photo, but I was wrong. The purple actually enhances the red.

I enjoy the shapes of the vines too; where did we humans get the idea for fences like that anyway? And the contrast of geometric and organic shapes was why I focused on this little scene to begin with, and then the sun came out and it got even better.

. . . . . . .

For a print of any photo, visit “purchasing” for availability and terms. For photos of lots of black cats and other cats—and even some birds as I first published this post there—visit The Creative Cat.


Berries in the Green

berries and leaves
berries and leaves

Berries in the Green

Nearly everything in the garden is fresh and new—and green. These nascent green berries by mid to late summer will be rich and vibrant colors.

The little frizzy cluster at the top are wild grapes which will grow to about the size of a marble and turn a dusty indigo, though most will be eaten by birds as they ripen; these grow on a vine and match with the leaves just behind them that resemble maple leaves, and while the grapes turn purple these leaves will turn bright yellow.

Clockwise is a cluster of little green balls which are Virginia creeper berries which will grow to about the size of a pea and turn deep red violet while the compound leaves—appearing like a cluster of five or six leaves in a circle—will turn brilliant red on the vine.

Hanging underneath them and off to the right are pale green mulberries which resemble blackberries in their elongated shape and cluster of smaller green spheres clumped together, and will turn first red then the same black-purple color as black berries while the leaves on this tree, the wide shiny elongated leaf with the notched edge, will turn yellow.

If you love gardening and watching things grow, please enjoy a recent post by composerinthegarden entitled “We Must Be Mad With Joy” so titled for a quote from Iris Murdoch, http://composerinthegarden.com/2013/05/24/we-must-be-mad-with-joy/.

Truly, I am mad with joy that there is so much life all around me that is constantly changing and growing, and all I need to do is watch.

 


Red, 2011

virginia creeper on weathered door
virginia creeper on weathered door

Red

Sometimes the scene is just visually stunning, especially with a little flash of angled late afternoon sun on that bright red Virginia Creeper. Love the peeling paint, the weathered wood, cloudy windows and the door hinge. Yet the plant flashes its brilliance before it fades, while the building simply fades.

This is from several years ago, but each October, on a day as warm as summer, I remember this moment and share it again.

If you’d like a print of this photo it is available in my photography collection in my Fine Art America gallery entitled, simply, “Red”.


Colors, 2011

autumn colors

Colors

Just this one red leaf in all those other colors. It’s from a Virginia Creeper vine that was mingling with the morning glories, though all the other leaves were still mostly green. But when the sun came out and touched this leaf it was as if the leaf itself was emitting the vibrant red.

I originally planned to crop out the morning glories thinking the red would be even more vibrant against all that green, its natural complement, and without the distraction of any other color in the photo, but I was wrong. The purple actually enhances the red.

I enjoy the shapes of the vines too; where did we humans get the idea for fences like that anyway? And the contrast of geometric and organic shapes was why I focused on this little scene to begin with, and then the sun came out and it got even better.


Red

virginia creeper on weathered door

Red

Sometimes the scene is just visually stunning, especially with a little flash of angled late afternoon sun on that bright red Virginia Creeper. Love the peeling paint, the weathered wood, cloudy windows and the door hinge. Yet the plant flashes its brilliance before it fades, while the building simply fades.

This is actually from last year, but I passed the same door, sans Virginia Creeper, and couldn’t get the photo out of my mind.


Colors

autumn colors

Colors

Just this one red leaf in all those other colors. It’s from a Virginia Creeper vine that was mingling with the morning glories, though all the other leaves were still mostly green. But when the sun came out and touched this leaf it was as if the leaf itself was emitting the vibrant red.

I originally planned to crop out the morning glories thinking the red would be even more vibrant against all that green, its natural complement, and without the distraction of any other color in the photo, but I was wrong. The purple actually enhances the red.

I enjoy the shapes of the vines too; where did we humans get the idea for fences like that anyway? And the contrast of geometric and organic shapes was why I focused on this little scene to begin with, and then the sun came out and it got even better.


Red

photo of red leaves in front of garage door

Red

Sometimes the scene is just visually stunning, especially with a little flash of angled late afternoon sun on that bright red Virginia Creeper. Love the peeling paint, the weathered wood and the door hinge.