an everyday photo, every day | photography • art • poetry

Posts tagged “wildflower

The First of Many Flowered Asters

Many-flowered Aster
Many-flowered Aster

Many-flowered Aster

The first of “many-flowered asters”, a classic autumn flower. That’s actually the name of the flower as well as a turn of phrase, but you can see by all the buds around this one flower that there will be many asters in the near future. When the stems bloom it’s a billow of white and yellow.

Sunrise and sunset are only 30 minutes from exactly 12 hours apart. Autumn is near.

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Chicory

chicory
chicory

Chicory Field

I love the individual flowers, but this field of chicory was very calming in gentle sunlight.

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All images in this post are copyright © Bernadette E. Kazmarski and may not be used without prior written permission.


Indian Mallow

indian mallow in bloom
indian mallow in bloom

Indian Mallow

The light was dim this morning, but it suited this plant. One of my favorite wildflowers, also known as Velvet Leaf for its large heart-shaped fuzzy leaves, blooming with tiny orange blossoms at the tips of these green cones as you see in the flower in the background waiting to open, and the blossom’s ovaries that always reminded me of the ovaries left after a poppy blossom falls apart. These blossoms last only a few hours, withering to nothing in just a day, while the green ovaries expand and then the plant dries to a warm brown. I love dried wildflowers, so dramatic, and I am letting these grow in my garden to attract and serve the pollinators but because they are considered pest plants, capable of taking over a field of just about anything, I cut the plant down as soon as the seed heads and stem are fairly dry. In midwinter, they come inside and sit in a vase against a blank wall where I can study them.


A Little Green Visitor: 2010

yellow flower with green insect
yellow flower with green insect

A Little Green Visitor

A colorblind leafhopper? Or perhaps he realized the effect of apple green on yellow-gold and wanted to stand out in the crowd unlike others of his species who generally camouflage themselves on leaves and stems. In any case this little insect visitor made a very nice composition on the black-eyed susan.


The Wild Carrot

queen anne's lace
queen anne's lace

The Wild Carrot

I post a lot of photos of, and I take even more of, Queen Anne’s Lace, out in the field in the country, sprouting from the space between a building and the street in the city, and in a vase in various places around my home. It is the wild carrot, and many legends of its name and medicinal powers have followed it through the centuries. It’s one of my favorite flowers and its delicate beauty combined with plenitude makes me love it even more.

We finally had some rain, and here it is in the vase in my front yard, refreshed by a storm with the sun just beginning to show through the soil.


A Little Green Visitor

leafhopper on black-eyed susan

A Little Green Visitor

A colorblind leafhopper? Or perhaps he realized the effect of apple green on yellow-gold and wanted to stand out in the crowd unlike others of his species who generally camouflage themselves on leaves and stems. In any case this little insect visitor made a very nice composition on the black-eyed susan.